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1.
Tyrosinase catalysed coupling of functional molecules onto protein fibres
Suzana Jus, Vanja Kokol, Georg M. Gübitz, 2008, original scientific article

Abstract: Grafting, using oxidative enzymes shows a high potential for wool fibres funktionalisation. In this work we attempt to graft on wool fibres with phenolic antioxidants order to introduce and improve the properties of the fibre. The approach of tyrosinase to oxidize tyrosine residues in wool proteins to quinones, which can further react with free sulfhydryl (thiol), amino or phenolic groups of different substrates was exploited to couple different phenolic antioxidants (caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid) onto the wool fibre proteins. Tyrosinase catalysed reactions were followed by different analytical methods like oxygen consumption, FT-NIR Raman and UV/VIS spectroscopy. It was proved that phenolic compounds used are strongly cross-linked on the wool fibre resulting to an improved antioxidant activity.
Keywords: textile fibres, wool fibers, tyrosinase, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, grafting, chemical modification of fibres
Published: 31.05.2012; Views: 994; Downloads: 64
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2.
Enzyme mediated coupling of protein-based biomaterials onto wool fibres
Suzana Jus, Georg M. Gübitz, Vanja Kokol, 2008, published scientific conference contribution abstract

Keywords: wool protein fibres, tyrosinase, grafting
Published: 31.05.2012; Views: 1002; Downloads: 28
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3.
Tyrosinase-catalysed coating of wool fibres with different protein-based biomaterials
Suzana Jus, Vanja Kokol, Georg M. Gübitz, 2009, original scientific article

Abstract: The potential of tyrosinases to activate tyrosine residues of wool protein fibres for cross-linking with different materials like collagen, elastin and gelatine was assessed. Natural fibres like wool offer an excellent environment for the growth of micro-organisms when the conditions like moisture, oxygen and temperature are appropriate. Coating with collagen, a very useful biomaterial with bactericidal and fungicidal properties, could be used to improve the properties of wool-based materials, especially when applied in hygienically sensitive applications like in hospitals. Tyrosinases were shown to catalyse the oxidation of tyrosine residues in wool and wool hydrolysates as model substrates, as determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Structural differences of the surface were evident from the increase of the intensity in the NH bending and stretching regions in the spectra of NIR FT Raman analysis of the enzyme treated and grafted wool fibres. The durability of the coating was also shown by using FITC-labelled collagen that was bound to the wool fibres, even after severe washing. Additionally, antimicrobial properties were successfully imparted due to the collagen grafted on the wool fibres. The functional and mechanical properties of the treated wool fibres showed no significant changes.
Keywords: textile fibres, wool, protein substrates, tyrosinase, enzymatic coupling, antimicrobial properties, coating
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 965; Downloads: 57
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