| | SLO | ENG | Cookies and privacy

Bigger font | Smaller font

Search the digital library catalog Help

Query: search in
search in
search in
search in
* old and bologna study programme

Options:
  Reset


1 - 7 / 7
First pagePrevious page1Next pageLast page
1.
Determining jurisdiction and the applicable law in cross-border unfair competition and unfair commercial practices cases
Iveta Rohová, David Sehnálek, 2017, original scientific article

Abstract: The free movement of goods promotes cross-border transactions. Computerization of services and intensified use of the Internet also contribute to the development of trade within the EU. Problems that could once be addressed almost exclusively or at least prevailingly at a national level currently assume cross-border character. This is also true in the case of regulation of unfair competition and unfair commercial practices. Whereas the substantive regulation of unfair competition in both EU and domestic law is quite common in scientific literature, its aspects in private international law are often neglected. Since the EU law has to a large extent replaced national conflict-of-law and procedural rules with unified EU provisions, this article focuses on the EU regulations Rome II and Brussels I bis with the emphasis put on the latter. The aim of this article is to review the rules determining jurisdiction (and the applicable law) on the basis of legal doctrine, current legislation and case law of the Court of Justice of the EU. Attention also will be paid to both off-line and on-line situations, as well as to the specifics of consumer protection in the context of unfair competition and unfair commercial practices.
Keywords: unfair competition, unfair commercial practices, private international law, applicable law, jurisdiction, on-line torts
Published in DKUM: 15.01.2021; Views: 400; Downloads: 19
URL Link to file
This document has many files! More...

2.
How to reduce discrimination in the workplace : the case of Austria and Taiwan (R.O.C.)
Vito Bobek, Anita Maček, Sarah Anna Bradler, Tatjana Horvat, 2018, original scientific article

Abstract: To intervene against discriminatory in the workplace is tremendously important because discriminatory practices have an enormous economic impact, along with a severe impact on psychological health, which can result in illnesses such as depression and burnout. Such intervention requires a multidimensional approach, including the whole organization and a systematic procedure. The aim of this paper is to offer suggestions on how to reduce discrimination in the workplace in Austria and Taiwan. To reach this aim, a qualitative study was conducted. It showed that education, active positioning of companies, leadership and diligent selection of employees, discussion and analysis, psychological support, governmental policies, and aspects of language and talking gender-wise are the most important steps to decrease or eliminate discrimination in the workplace.
Keywords: discrimination, business practices, leadership, workplace
Published in DKUM: 10.10.2018; Views: 1245; Downloads: 166
.pdf Full text (738,53 KB)
This document has many files! More...

3.
Determining jurisdiction and the applicable law in cross-border unfair competition and unfair commercial practices cases
Iveta Rohová, David Sehnálek, 2017, original scientific article

Abstract: The free movement of goods promotes cross-border transactions. Computerization of services and intensified use of the Internet also contribute to the development of trade within the EU. Problems that could once be addressed almost exclusively or at least prevailingly at a national level currently assume cross-border character. This is also true in the case of regulation of unfair competition and unfair commercial practices. Whereas the substantive regulation of unfair competition in both EU and domestic law is quite common in scientific literature, its aspects in private international law are often neglected. Since the EU law has to a large extent replaced national conflict-of-law and procedural rules with unified EU provisions, this article focuses on the EU regulations Rome II and Brussels I bis with the emphasis put on the latter. The aim of this article is to review the rules determining jurisdiction (and the applicable law) on the basis of legal doctrine, current legislation and case law of the Court of Justice of the EU. Attention also will be paid to both off-line and on-line situations, as well as to the specifics of consumer protection in the context of unfair competition and unfair commercial practices.
Keywords: unfair competition, unfair commercial practices, private international law, applicable law, jurisdiction, on-line torts
Published in DKUM: 02.08.2018; Views: 770; Downloads: 64
.pdf Full text (559,94 KB)
This document has many files! More...

4.
Green logistics - development and implementation
Matjaž Knez, Matevž Obrecht, 2016, independent scientific component part or a chapter in a monograph

Abstract: Environmental problems, material depletion, and high dependency on fossil fuels are core problems of logistics in the EU as well as globally. Therefore, numerous countries, in particular Member States of the EU, have ambitious goals for the increased use of renewables, increased energy efficiency, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, transition to sustainable transportation and similar changes. EU companies are, therefore, strongly committed to reducing their environmental impact, reducing the use of fossil fuels and becoming more sustainable. Logistics companies are no exception due to the impact of logistics processes, such as transportation and distribution that impact human health, ecosystem and air quality, climate changes (with noise, vibrations, fossil fuel related harmful emissions etc.), warehousing (especially with energy used for heating and cooling) and packaging (especially with the use of material). Therefore, the implementation of green logistics is necessary for the sustainable future of our planet. This chapter identifies how the idea of green logistics was developed and has evolved, analyses key problems for its implementation, and presents the current status of green logistics, including the best practices of green logistics implementation in selected organizations.
Keywords: logistics, green logistics, reverse logistics, best practices, business strategies, implementation
Published in DKUM: 09.05.2018; Views: 990; Downloads: 90
.pdf Full text (334,87 KB)
This document has many files! More...

5.
Supporting learning skills in visual art classes : The benefits of teacher awareness
Helen Arov, Anna-Liisa Jõgi, 2017, original scientific article

Abstract: This study focused on middle school art teachers supporting the development of students' learning skills, specifically their awareness of the framework of learning skills. It also looked at the relations between the teaching practices teachers use for supporting learning skills and students' learning motivation in art classes. The study combined qualitative and quantitative research methods. The class observations and interviews were conducted with ten Estonian middle school art teachers. One hundred and forty-eight students from the observed classes filled out the learning motivation questionnaire about their interest and achievement goals in visual arts. The study draws attention to the importance of teachers being aware of and valuing learning skills alongside subject specific knowledge, as it could enhance students' autonomous motivation and support adaptive goal setting.
Keywords: learning skills, learning motivation, teaching practices, middle school, art education
Published in DKUM: 13.11.2017; Views: 1287; Downloads: 172
.pdf Full text (550,91 KB)
This document has many files! More...

6.
Implementing quality indicators for diabetes and hypertension in family medicine in Slovenia
Zalika Klemenc-Ketiš, Igor Švab, Tonka Poplas-Susič, 2017, original scientific article

Abstract: Introduction: A new form of family practices was introduced in 2011 through a pilot project introducing nurse practitioners as members of team and determining a set of quality indicators. The aim of this article was to assess the quality of diabetes and hypertension management. Methods: We included all family medicine practices that were participating in the project in December 2015 (N=584). The following data were extracted from automatic electronic reports on quality indicators: gender and specialisation of the family physician, status (public servant/self-contracted), duration of participation in the project, region of Slovenia, the number of inhabitants covered by a family medicine practice, the name of IT provider, and levels of selected quality indicators. Results: Out of 584 family medicine practices that were included in this project at the end of 2015, 568 (97.3%) had complete data and could be included in this analysis. The highest values were observed for structure quality indicator (list of diabetics) and the lowest for process and outcome quality indicators. The values of the selected quality indicators were independently associated with the duration of participation in the project, some regions of Slovenia where practices were located, and some IT providers of the practices. Conclusion: First, the analysis of data on quality indicators for diabetes and hypertension in this primary care project pointed out the problems which are currently preventing higher quality of chronic patient management at the primary health care level.
Keywords: family practices, healthcare quality indicator, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, Slovenia
Published in DKUM: 03.11.2017; Views: 1101; Downloads: 322
.pdf Full text (424,82 KB)
This document has many files! More...

7.
Management practices utilization in organizations : a comparison between catching-up and well-developed economies
Zlatko Nedelko, Vojko Potočan, 2016, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: The main purpose of this paper is to examine the utilization of management practices in catching-up and well-developed economies. Within that framework, the paper examines the utilization of management practices in Slovenian and Croatian organizations, as both are considered the representatives of catching-up economies from Central and East Europe (CEE), while also comparing the utilization of management practices in the two selected economies to the global use of management practices. Evidences about management practices utilization reveal that in well-developed economies in the forefront are management practices aiming to support customer relationship management, strength customer relations and customer satisfaction, while in Slovenia and Croatia prevail practices that are oriented toward optimization of the business and its processes. Based on the research results and the situation in organizations, a possible future pattern of management practice utilization in organizations operating in catching up economies is outlined, with the aim to reduce the developmental lag and increase competitiveness of those organizations. The paper also provides several practical implications for future utilization of management practices in catching-up economies. The sample of catching up-countries includes 155 responses from employees in Slovenian organizations and 185 from Croatian ones. Data for samples from well-developed economies are obtained from a global survey of management practices.
Keywords: management practices, utilization, catching-up economy, well-developed economy, international comparison
Published in DKUM: 04.07.2017; Views: 679; Downloads: 106
.pdf Full text (426,33 KB)
This document has many files! More...

Search done in 0.1 sec.
Back to top
Logos of partners University of Maribor University of Ljubljana University of Primorska University of Nova Gorica