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Supplementary material for paper Comparison of the evolution of the COVID-19 disease between Romania and Italy
Ciprian Chiruţa, Emilian Bulgariu, Jurij Avsec, Brigita Ferčec, Matej Mencinger, 2020, complete scientific database or corpus

Keywords: COVID-19 pandemic evolution, time dependent SIR model, coronavirus
Published: 23.12.2020; Views: 241; Downloads: 582
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3.
Comparison of the evolution of the COVID-19 disease between Romania and Italy
Ciprian Chiruţa, Emilian Bulgariu, Jurij Avsec, Brigita Ferčec, Matej Mencinger, 2020, original scientific article

Abstract: After the outbreak of COVID-19 in Italy, thousands of Romanian citizens who worked in Northern Italy, Spain or Germany returned to Romania. Based on the time-dependent susceptible–infected–recovered—SIR model, this paper compares the evolution of the COVID-19 disease between Romania and Italy, assuming that the parameter value of R0 in the time-dependent SIR model decreases to R1 < R0 after publicly announced restrictions by the government, and increases to a value of R2 < R1 when the restrictions are lifted. Among other things, we answer the questions about the date and extent of the second peak in Italy and Romania with respect to different values of R2 and the duration of the restrictions.
Keywords: COVID-19 pandemic evolution, time dependent SIR model, coronavirus
Published: 22.12.2020; Views: 191; Downloads: 76
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The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 on the quality of STEM higher education
Zorka Novak-Pintarič, Zdravko Kravanja, 2020, short scientific article

Abstract: Pandemic COVID-19 has forced universities around the world to go online virtually overnight. This has been a major challenge, especially for study programmes in STEM areas (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) where distance learning was not previously preferred. This was mainly due to a large proportion of the experimental laboratory work done by students, which could reach up to half of all contact hours. While the lectures were utilized practically immediately after lockdown using video conferencing systems, the implementation of the practical study contents posed a greater challenge. This paper presents specific adaptations for certain activities in the university education of chemical engineering that had to be implemented quickly, such as laboratory and computer exercises, students' final theses and dissertations, internships, knowledge examination and evaluation. We highlight the most critical activities and most urgent solutions that were initiated. Various measures taken against the spread of the coronavirus had to take into account many uncertainties about the duration of the pandemic to ensure that students acquire the desired competences and skills in time without being physically present in the laboratories. Particular attention is paid to examinations, especially calculus tests, which are difficult to apply remotely. First evaluations show that the adapted learning process has been carried out effectively, but the big unknown is how successfully the students will pass the exams and how the lessons will be conducted in next academic year.
Keywords: pandemic, higher education, COVID-19, coronavirus
Published: 16.12.2020; Views: 729; Downloads: 80
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All together to fight COVID-19
Sara Momtazmanesh, Hans D. Ochs, Lucina Q. Uddin, Matjaž Perc, John M. Routes, Duarte Nuno Vieira, Waleed Al-Herz, Safa Baris, Carolina Prando, Laszlo Rosivall, Amir Hamzah Abdul Latiff, Timo Ulrichs, Vasili Roudenok, Juan Carlos Aldave Becerra, Deepak B. Salunke, Ekaterini Goudouris, Antonio Condino-Neto, Anzhela Stashchak, Oleksandr Kryvenko, Mykola Stashchak, Anastasia Bondarenko, Nima Rezaei, 2020, polemic, discussion, commentary

Abstract: Novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), named a pandemic by the WHO, is the current global health crisis. National and international collaboration are indispensable for combating COVID-19 and other similar potential outbreaks. International efforts to tackle this complex problem have led to remarkable scientific advances. Yet, as a global society, we can and must take additional measures to fight this pandemic. Undoubtedly, our approach toward COVID-19 was not perfect, and testing has not been deployed fast enough to arrest the epidemic early on. It is critical that we revise our approaches to be more prepared for pandemics as a united body by promoting global cooperation and commitment.
Keywords: COVID-19, coronavirus, pandemic, disease dynamics, exponential growth, virality
Published: 12.11.2020; Views: 202; Downloads: 52
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COLOSS survey: global impact of COVID-19 on bee research
Raffaele Dall’Olio, Tjeerd Blacquiere, Maria Bouga, Robert Brodschneider, Norman L Carreck, Panuwan Chantawannakul, Vincent Dietemann, Lotta Fabricius Kristiansen, Anna M. Gajda, Aleš Gregorc, Asli Ozkirim, Christian Pirk, Victoria Soroker, Geoffrey R. Williams, Peter Neumann, review article

Abstract: The socio-economic impacts of COVID-19 on society have yet to be truly revealed; there is no doubt that the pandemic has severely affected the daily lives of most of humanity. It is to be expected that the research activities of scientists could be impacted to varying degrees, but no data exist on how COVID-19 has affected research specifically. Here, we show that the still ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has already diversely and negatively affected bee research at a global level. An online survey disseminated through the global COLOSS honey bee research association showed that every participant (n = 230 from 56 countries) reported an impact on one or more of their activities. Activities that require travelling or the physical presence of people (meetings and conferences, teaching and extension) were affected the most, but also laboratory and field activities, daily operations, supervision and other activities were affected to varying degrees. Since the basic activities are very similar for many research fields, it appears as if our findings for bee research can be extrapolated to other fields. In the light of our data, we recommend that stakeholders such as governments and funding bodies who support research should facilitate the wide implementation of web-based information technology required for efficient online communication for research and education, as well as adequately loosened restriction measures with respect to field and laboratory work. Finally, increased flexibility in administration and extension of research grants and fellowships seem to be needed. It is apparent that adequate responses by all stakeholders are required to limit the impact of COVID-19 and future pandemics on bee science and other research fields.
Keywords: COLOSS, Apis mellifera, coronavirus, COVID-19, honey bee, pandemic, research, extension
Published: 12.11.2020; Views: 174; Downloads: 73
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Research data and software for paper Forecasting COVID-19
Matjaž Perc, Nina Gorišek Miksić, Mitja Slavinec, Andraž Stožer, 2020, original scientific article

Abstract: The World Health Organization declared the coronavirus disease 2019 a pandemic on March 11th, pointing to the over 118,000 cases in over 110 countries and territories around the world at that time. At the time of writing this manuscript, the number of confirmed cases has been surging rapidly past the half-million mark, emphasizing the sustained risk of further global spread. Governments around the world are imposing various containment measures while the healthcare system is bracing itself for tsunamis of infected individuals that will seek treatment. It is therefore important to know what to expect in terms of the growth of the number of cases, and to understand what is needed to arrest the very worrying trends. To that effect, we here show forecasts obtained with a simple iteration method that needs only the daily values of confirmed cases as input. The method takes into account expected recoveries and deaths, and it determines maximally allowed daily growth rates that lead away from exponential increase toward stable and declining numbers. Forecasts show that daily growth rates should be kept at least below 5% if we wish to see plateaus any time soon - unfortunately far from reality in most countries to date. We provide an executable as well as the source code for a straightforward application of the method on data from other countries.
Keywords: COVID-19, pandemic, disease dynamics, exponential growth, virality
Published: 06.11.2020; Views: 313; Downloads: 132
.pdf Full text (639,28 KB)
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9.
Forecasting COVID-19
Matjaž Perc, Nina Gorišek Miksić, Mitja Slavinec, Andraž Stožer, 2020, short scientific article

Abstract: The World Health Organization declared the coronavirus disease 2019 a pandemic on March 11th, pointing to the over 118,000 cases in over 110 countries and territories around the world at that time. At the time of writing this manuscript, the number of confirmed cases has been surging rapidly past the half-million mark, emphasizing the sustained risk of further global spread. Governments around the world are imposing various containment measures while the healthcare system is bracing itself for tsunamis of infected individuals that will seek treatment. It is therefore important to know what to expect in terms of the growth of the number of cases, and to understand what is needed to arrest the very worrying trends. To that effect, we here show forecasts obtained with a simple iteration method that needs only the daily values of confirmed cases as input. The method takes into account expected recoveries and deaths, and it determines maximally allowed daily growth rates that lead away from exponential increase toward stable and declining numbers. Forecasts show that daily growth rates should be kept at least below 5% if we wish to see plateaus any time soon - unfortunately far from reality in most countries to date. We provide an executable as well as the source code for a straightforward application of the method on data from other countries.
Keywords: COVID-19, pandemic, disease dynamics, exponential growth, virality
Published: 06.11.2020; Views: 212; Downloads: 48
.pdf Full text (639,28 KB); This document is also a collection of 1 document!

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