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1.
Towards building a forensics aware language for secure logging
Shams Zawoad, Marjan Mernik, Ragib Hasan, 2014, original scientific article

Abstract: Trustworthy system logs and application logs are crucial for digital forensics. Researchers have proposed different security mechanisms to ensure the integrity and confidentiality of logs. However, applying current secure logging schemes on heterogeneous formats of logs is tedious. Here, we propose Forensics Aware Language (FAL), a domain-specific language (DSL) through which we can apply a secure logging mechanism on any format of logs. Using FAL, we can define log structure, which represents the format of logs and ensures the security properties of a chosen secure logging scheme. This log structure can later be used by FAL to serve two purposes: it can be used to store system logs securely and it will help application developers for secure application logging by generating the required source code.
Keywords: domain-specific language, DSL, secure logging, audit trail, digital forensics
Published in DKUM: 06.07.2017; Views: 922; Downloads: 327
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2.
Ontology driven development of domain-specific languages
Ines Čeh, Matej Črepinšek, Tomaž Kosar, Marjan Mernik, 2011, original scientific article

Abstract: Domain-specific languages (DSLs) are computer (programming, modeling, specification) languages devoted to solving problems in a specific domain. Thedevelopment of a DSL includes the following phases: decision, analysis, design, implementation, testing, deployment, and maintenance. The least-known and least examined are analysis and design. Although various formal methodologies exist, domain analysis is still done informally most of the time. A common reason why formal methodologies are not used as often as they could be is that they are very demanding. Instead of developing a new, less complex methodology, we propose that domain analysis could be replaced with a previously existing analysis in another form. A particularly suitable form is the use of ontologies. This paper focuses on ontology-based domain analysis and how it can be incorporated into the DSL design phase. We will present the preliminary results of the Ontology2DSL framework, which can be used to help transform ontology to a DSL grammar incorporating concepts from a domain.
Keywords: domain specific language, domain analysis, ontology
Published in DKUM: 06.07.2017; Views: 1135; Downloads: 477
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3.
Implementation of EasyTime formal semantics using a LISA compiler generator
Iztok Fister, Marjan Mernik, Iztok Fister, Dejan Hrnčič, 2012, original scientific article

Abstract: A manual measuring time tool in mass sporting competitions would not be imaginable nowadays, because many modern disciplines, such as IRONMAN, last a long-time and, therefore, demand additional reliability. Moreover, automatic timing-devices based on RFID technology, have become cheaper. However, these devices cannot operate as standalone because they need a computer measuring system that is capable of processing incoming events, encoding the results, assigning them to the correct competitor, sorting the results according to theachieved times, and then providing a printout of the results. This article presents the domain-specific language EasyTime, which enables the controlling of an agent by writing the events within a database. It focuses, in particular, on the implementation of EasyTime with a LISA tool that enables the automatic construction of compilers from language specifications, using Attribute Grammars.
Keywords: domain specific modelling language, compiler, code generator, measuring time
Published in DKUM: 06.07.2017; Views: 1145; Downloads: 333
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4.
From DCOM interfaces to domain-specific modeling language : a case study on the sequencer
Tomaž Kos, Tomaž Kosar, Jure Knez, Marjan Mernik, 2011, original scientific article

Abstract: Software development is a demanding process, since it involves different parties to perform a desired task. The same case applies to the development ofmeasurement systems - measurement system producers often provide interfaces to their products, after which the customersć programming engineers use them to build software according to the instructions and requirements of domain experts from the field of data acquisition. Until recently, the customers of the measurement system DEWESoft were building measuring applications, using prefabricated DCOM objects. However, a significant amount of interaction between customersć programming engineers and measurement system producers is necessary to use DCOM objects. Therefore, a domain-specific modeling language has been developed to enable domain experts to program or model their own measurement procedures without interacting with programming engineers. In thispaper, experiences gained during the shift from using the DEWESoft productas a programming library to domain-specific modeling language are provided together with the details of a Sequencer, a domain-specific modeling language for the construction of measurement procedures.
Keywords: domain specific modelling language, data acquisition, measurement systems
Published in DKUM: 06.07.2017; Views: 963; Downloads: 140
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5.
A DSL for the development of software agents working within a semantic web environment
Sebla Demirkol, Moharram Challenger, Sinem Getir, Tomaž Kosar, Geylani Kardas, Marjan Mernik, 2013, original scientific article

Abstract: Software agents became popular in the development of complex software systems,especially those requiring autonomous and proactive behavior. Agents interact with each other within a Multi-agent System (MAS), in order to perform certain defined tasks in a collaborative and/or selfish manner. However, the autonomous, proactive and interactive structure of MAS causes difficulties when developing such software systems. It is within this context,that the use of a Domain-specific Language (DSL) may support easier and quicker MAS development methodology. The impact of such DSL usage could beclearer when considering the development of MASs, especially those working on new challenging environments like the Semantic Web. Hence, this paper introduces a new DSL for Semantic Web enabled MASs. This new DSL is called Semantic web Enabled Agent Language (SEA_L). Both the SEA_L user-aspects and the way of implementing SEA_L are discussed in the paper. The practical use of SEA_L is also demonstrated using a case study which considers the modeling of a multi-agent based e-barter system. When considering the language implementation, we first discuss the syntax of SEA_L and we show how the specifications of SEA_L can be utilized during the code generation of real MAS implementations. The syntax of SEA_L is supported by textual modeling toolkits developed with Xtext. Code generation for the instance models are supplied with the Xpand tool.
Keywords: domain-specific language, DSL, metamodel, multi-agent system, semantic web
Published in DKUM: 06.07.2017; Views: 778; Downloads: 342
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7.
Local search engine with global content based on domain specific knowledge
Sandi Pohorec, Mateja Verlič, Milan Zorman, 2009, original scientific article

Abstract: In the growing need for information we have come to rely on search engines. The use of large scale search engines, such as Google, is as common as surfingthe World Wide Web. We are impressed with the capabilities of these search engines but still there is a need for improvment. A common problem withsearching is the ambiguity of words. Their meaning often depends on the context in which they are used or varies across specific domains. To resolve this we propose a domain specific search engine that is globally oriented. We intend to provide content classification according to the target domain concepts, access to privileged information, personalization and custom rankingfunctions. Domain specific concepts have been formalized in the form ofontology. The paper describes our approach to a centralized search service for domain specific content. The approach uses automated indexing for various content sources that can be found in the form of a relational database, we! b service, web portal or page, various document formats and other structured or unstructured data. The gathered data is tagged with various approaches and classified against the domain classification. The indexed data is accessible through a highly optimized and personalized search service.
Keywords: information search, personalization, indexes, crawling, domain specific crawling, natural language processing, content tagging, distributed data sources, ranking functions
Published in DKUM: 31.05.2012; Views: 1626; Downloads: 35
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8.
Is my DSL a modeling or programming language?
Yu Sun, Zekai Demirezen, Marjan Mernik, Jeffrey G. Gray, Barrett Richard Bryant, 2008, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: It is often difficult to discern the differences between programming and modeling languages. As an example, the term "domain-specific language" has been used almost interchangeably in academia and industry to represent both programming and modeling languages, which has caused subtle misconceptions. The borders between a modeling and programming language are somewhat vague and not defined crisply. This paper discusses the similarities and differences between modeling and programming languages, and offers some suggestions on how to better differentiate such languages. A list of criteria is presented for language classification, but it is suggested that a set of the criteria be used, rather than a single criterion. Several example domain-specific languages are used as case studies to motivate the discussion.
Keywords: domain-specific languages, programming languages, modeling language
Published in DKUM: 31.05.2012; Views: 1316; Downloads: 35
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9.
Model transformations require formal semantics
Yu Sun, Zekai Demirezen, Tomaž Lukman, Marjan Mernik, Jeffrey G. Gray, 2008, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: Despite the increasing interest in model-driven engineering, there are many open issues that need to be addressed to advance the technology and promote its adoption. This position paper outlines several current limitations of model transformation, with a specific emphasis on model optimization. A primary shortcoming that can be found in many model transformation approaches and tools is the lack of formal semantics to define the meaning of a modeling abstraction. This inadequacy is the source of many problems surrounding the practice of model engineering.
Keywords: domain-specific languages, program transformation, model transformation, model-driven engineering, modeling language
Published in DKUM: 31.05.2012; Views: 1595; Downloads: 35
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