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1.
Tyrosinase catalysed coupling of functional molecules onto protein fibres
Suzana Jus, Vanja Kokol, Georg M. Gübitz, 2008, original scientific article

Abstract: Grafting, using oxidative enzymes shows a high potential for wool fibres funktionalisation. In this work we attempt to graft on wool fibres with phenolic antioxidants order to introduce and improve the properties of the fibre. The approach of tyrosinase to oxidize tyrosine residues in wool proteins to quinones, which can further react with free sulfhydryl (thiol), amino or phenolic groups of different substrates was exploited to couple different phenolic antioxidants (caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid) onto the wool fibre proteins. Tyrosinase catalysed reactions were followed by different analytical methods like oxygen consumption, FT-NIR Raman and UV/VIS spectroscopy. It was proved that phenolic compounds used are strongly cross-linked on the wool fibre resulting to an improved antioxidant activity.
Keywords: textile fibres, wool fibers, tyrosinase, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, grafting, chemical modification of fibres
Published: 31.05.2012; Views: 992; Downloads: 64
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2.
Grafting of cotton with [beta]-cyclodextrin via poly(carboxylic acid)
Bojana Vončina, Alenka Majcen Le Marechal, 2005, original scientific article

Abstract: Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides. Cyclodextrin molecules can form inclusion complexes with a large number of organic molecules. The properties of cyclodextrins enable them to be used in a variety of different textile applications. Cyclodextrins can act as auxiliaries in washing and dyeing processes, and they can also be fixed onto different fiber surfaces. Because of the complexing abilities of cyclodextrins, textiles with new functional properties can be prepared. Poly(carboxylic acid)s such as 1,2,3,4-butane tetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) are well-known non-formaldehyde crosslinking reagents. BTCA has four carboxylic acid groups, which can react with hydroxyl groups of cellulose and form stable ester bonds. We crosslinked -cyclodextrin molecules on hydroxyl groups of cellulose via BTCA.
Keywords: textile fibres, chemical modification, beta cyclodextrines, butane tetracarboxylic acid, BTCA, FTIR, host-guest systems, formaldehyde-free crosslinking reagents
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 1299; Downloads: 35
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3.
Grafting of ethylcellulose microcapsules onto cotton fibres
Roxana Badulescu, Vera Vivod, Darja Jaušovec, Bojana Vončina, 2008, original scientific article

Abstract: In this paper a treatment of cotton with ethylcellulose (EC) microcapsules wasinvestigated. EC microcapsules containing Rosemary oil were obtained by phase separation method. The surface and morphology of microcapsules were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Microcapsules with a regular spherical shape in the 10-90 m size range were prepared and grafted onto cotton using the crosslinking reagent 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) in the presence of catalysts. The influence of the two catalysts, cyanamide (CA) and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) on curing efficiency (grafting) was investigated. SEM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to study the formation of ester bonds between BTCA and hydroxyl groups of cotton and/or hydroxyl groups of EC. When DCC was used as acatalyst, the esterification took place slowly at room temperature. In the case of CA, the cotton was cured at 110 °C for several minutes. After 2 min curing, the microcapsules, which kept their original shape, were bonded to thecotton fibers. Increasing the curing time altered the microcapsule shell. Grafting and crosslinking reactions of the thermofixed EC microcapsules onto cotton were proposed.
Keywords: textiles, chemical modification, cotton fibres, ethylcellulose, microcapsules, BTCA, SEM, FT-IR, grafting
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 1151; Downloads: 26
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4.
The influence of structural properties on the dye diffusion and dyeability of PA 6 fibres
Simona Strnad, Slava Jeler, Karin Stana-Kleinschek, Tatjana Kreže, 2003, original scientific article

Abstract: The relationships were investigated between the structural and dyeing properties of different structurally modified PA 6 fibers. PA 6 monofilament yarn samples were applied having different crystalline degrees and different content of alpha, respectively gamma crystalline modification. The diffusion coefficients of two different acid dyes were determined together with the content of dyestuff absorbed (under specific conditions) by fiber samples. In order to estimate colorimetry method from the viewpoint of polymer structural change detection, the colors of the dyed PA 6 samples were determined (L*, a*,b*, C*, h coordinates) and the color differences (L*, a*, b*, C*, H*, E*) were calculated between untreated standard and structurally modified samples. The dyeability of PA 6 fibers depended mainly on the way in which crystallinity had been achieved, i.e. on the materialćs history. Different crystalline modifications caused different sorption properties and fiber dyeability. Smaller increases (app 20%) of crystallinity degree caused a decrease in diffusion coefficients. Contrary to expectations, the significant increase of crystallinity degree (app 50%) had an influence on the increase ofdyeability, presumably owing to the formation of larger empty spaces in the structure. The results achieved by colorimetry were in good correlation with dye absorption measurements. The colorimetry of dyed fiber samples was sensitive enough to detect even small differences in the quantities of absorbed dyestuff.
Keywords: textiles, PA 6 fibres, dyeing, dyeability, fibre structure, crystallinity, chemical modification
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 1458; Downloads: 14
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