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1.
THE SALACIOUS SIDE OF SHAKESPEARE: Omissions and Paraphrase of Sexual Allusions and Wordplays in Slovene Translations of Romeo and Juliet
Ana Marić, 2020, master's thesis

Abstract: While many of his works have since been translated into Slovene, Shakespeare’s extensive vocabulary and clever phrasing are still relatively unexplored in the Slovene language, including the incessant use of obscene words and vulgar expressions in his texts that often end up lost in translation. The initiative of the thesis was to determine how much of Shakespeare’s suggestive text elements, sexual(ized) wordplays, and bawdy innuendos become subject to omission or heavily paraphrased and why. Based on a theoretical and analytical research, where the latter was centred around an analysis of the English original Romeo and Juliet, and two of its Slovene translations, specific text segments were evaluated based on the model for a linguistic analysis of text by Kitty Van Leuven-Zwart. The analysis covered a comparison between the original and its translations, whilst simultaneously comparing both translations in contrast to each other to see which dissimilarities of sexually suggestive and vulgar elements of text occur in the transition from the original to its translations. Results have shown that while dissimilarities appear in both translations to a similar degree, the categories of dissimilarity that mostly transpire during translation noticeably vary between the selected translations.
Keywords: Shakespeare, translation, wordplay, sexual allusions, vulgar language
Published: 12.02.2021; Views: 127; Downloads: 18
.pdf Full text (911,01 KB)

2.
Diminutives in Three Slovene Translations of Hamlet: Contrastive Analysis of the Original and the Translations
Urša Marinšek, 2018, master's thesis

Abstract: The use and formation of diminutives in English and Slovene differ to a considerable extent. The main categorization of diminutives into two groups according to their morphological structure classifies them into analytic and syntactic diminutives. On the one hand, it seems that in the English language it is difficult to find syntactic diminutives; this language apparently favors the analytical ones. On the other hand, there is a high frequency of syntactical diminutives in Slovene. These general characteristics of the two languages are expected to be replicated in literary works, therefore, also in drama, which – at least in theory – comes as close to spoken discourse as possible. These differences will therefore become evident in the contrastive analysis of Shakespeare’s Hamlet and its three Slovene translations. Furthermore, it will be interesting to see how the diminutives, their structure, function and even existence will vary in the process of translation from one language into the other. This thesis thus explores diminutives in four versions of this famous play by William Shakespeare: the original Hamlet and its three Slovene translations, which were completed over a relatively long time span by three different Slovene translators. Contrastive analysis shows that there are significant differences when it comes to the usage of diminutives. It is not just their presence, absence or modification that is interesting, but more importantly it is their stylistic function. Diminutives in the traditional sense mark “smallness,” but several other important functions emerge within dramatic texts. Emotional nakedness proved to be one of the most important roles and functions. In this role, they can express endearment, sarcasm, irony, facetiousness and many other stylistic and semantic nuances. If a diminutive is present in the original and carries emotional markedness, it is highly important for the translator to do his or her best to preserve this markedness (or compensate for it with a similar type of markedness) in the translation and thus retain the style of the original. If the translator is unsuccessful in this undertaking, regardless of whether objective reasons for such translation shifts exist, the translation inevitably loses. Questions related to changes in the interpretative potential of the translation versus the original represent one of the central issues in this Master’s thesis. Shakespeare has a long tradition in the Slovene cultural space and, therefore, in the Slovene context – and vice versa: Slovene readers and theatregoers have been acquainted with his plays for a long time. Hamlet has been translated into Slovene more than five times, and even more adaptations exist. The first translation of Hamlet dates back to the late 19th century, and the most recent to 2013 (translated by Srečko Fišer), which makes a time span of more than a hundred years. Because of multiple existing translations, this drama is a perfect candidate for a contrastive analysis such as this thesis and its research into the preservation of stylistic elements in translation. Only three translations are examined in this thesis, but they differ from each other in many respects. Considering their core characteristics, we could afford to label each of them with a distinctive adjective: Oton Župančič’s translation could be seen as the “traditional” one, Janko Moder’s as “experimental” and Milan Jesih’s as “modern.” Each translator has his own approach to the translation of diminutives, their employment, function and even formation; in some cases (but not all), one could even call it strategy. This means that if there is a diminutive in the original, it is not necessary that all (if any) of these translators will preserve it.
Keywords: William Shakespeare, Hamlet, contrastive analysis, translation, stylistics, diminutives, emotional markedness
Published: 03.10.2018; Views: 482; Downloads: 62
.pdf Full text (711,11 KB)

3.
Lexicalisation patterns of rendering path descriptions in Polish translation from English
Dorota Chłopek, 2012, original scientific article

Abstract: The article pertains to the powerful bi-categorial typology of languages developed by Talmy. The researcher generally points at satellite-framed languages and verb-framed languages in terms of conflating the semantic component of path, either to a satellite placed near a manner verb or to a verb root. Slobin expanded that typology by introducing a class of equipollently framed languages. English and Polish are both satellite-framed languages. Nonetheless, while English colloquially expresses ideas with constructions lexicalising precise path through satellites, Polish translation renders the path, neutralises it, changes it, or omits the path conveyed by the original version, which is illustrated by this paper.
Keywords: Talmy, typology, translation, pattern, English, Polish
Published: 12.02.2018; Views: 558; Downloads: 255
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4.
Examples of constructions with the simple topological English prepositions in and at expressed in selected Slavic languages
Dorota Chłopek, 2009, original scientific article

Abstract: The objects of study in this paper are selected English expressions with the simple topological prepositions in and at expressed in the following Slavic languages: Polish, Czech, Slovene, Serbian and Croatian. Simple locational, topological relations which the English language encodes through two separate prepositions in and at tend to be constructed by a single form in many Slavic languages. The concerns of the paper are selected English constructions expressing physical coincidence through in and functional coincidence through at, rendered into the five Slavic languages, where the scenes may not include the difference in dimensionality existing in the source expressions, which causes many translational problems.
Keywords: linguistics, English, grammar, proposal, translation, Slavic languages, topological constructions, prepositions, locational, func- tional coincidence, translation
Published: 30.01.2018; Views: 560; Downloads: 272
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5.
Names in literary translation
Darja Mazi Leskovar, 2017, original scientific article

Abstract: This article presents three English translations of the Slovenian tale Martin Krpan z Vrha (1858) by Fran Levstik and focuses on the translation of personal and geographical names with the aim of examining the application of domestication and foreignization translation strategies. The comparative analysis of the English names aims to find out if the cultural gap between the source and the target cultures has been diminishing over the years. The study also highlights the role of the chronotope that gives the work, one of the most frequently translated Slovenian texts, a distinctive cultural character.
Keywords: English translations of Martin Krpan, comparative analysis of translated name, domestication and foreignization strategies, chronotope, Slovene literature, literary translation
Published: 30.11.2017; Views: 576; Downloads: 78
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6.
The challenges of translating culturally-specific elements
Natalia Kaloh Vid, 2016, original scientific article

Abstract: Mikhail Bulgakov's novel The Master and Margarita, a highly complex and multi-levelled narrative, is a challenge for any translator. The emphasis in the current research is on the translation strategies used when translating culturally-specific elements, or historical realia, referred to as "Sovietisms," in three English translations of the novel by Glenny (1967), Pevear and Volokhonsky (1997) and Aplin (2008). Sovietisms refer to items characteristic of the Soviet discourse of the 1930s: word-formations of the non-standard "Soviet Russian." Bulgakov's language is sated with Soviet vocabulary, which refers to various cultural and socio-political elements of Soviet reality. Sovietisms occur at various levels (lexical, syntactic, stylistic and rhetorical) and should be carefully translated as a significant characteristic of Bulgakov's style. A complete domestication of Sovietisms may lead to a loss of a connotative meaning essential for understanding the context, while a foreignisation of these terms, which are most likely unknown to western readers, may disturb fluidity of reading and cause confusion. The purpose of this analysis, thus, is to illustrate the use of domesticating/foreignising strategies employed by Bulgakov's translators and to assess the translation choices. The comparative analysis employs the taxonomies suggested by Vlakhov and Florin (1995) and Vinay and Darbelnet (1958/1989) as the grounds for the case study.
Keywords: Russian literature, Soviet literature, literary translation, culture, discourse
Published: 17.08.2017; Views: 687; Downloads: 111
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7.
Words and music
Nada Šabec, 2016, preface, afterword

Abstract: The introduction to the special issue of ELOPE (Vol. 13, No. 1, 2016).
Keywords: music, language, literature, language teaching, translation studies
Published: 16.05.2017; Views: 724; Downloads: 91
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8.
Use of domesticated and foreignized methods in the Soviet school of translation
Natalia Kaloh Vid, 2007, original scientific article

Abstract: The article focuses on prevailing translation methods used in the Soviet translation school. The main aim of the research is to analyze translation strategies, principles and methods used by Soviet translators who were forced to work in a cultural vacuum under strong ideological influence. The aim is toexplain the main reasons for an absolute priority of domesticated translation in the Soviet translation school, while foreignized translation was strongly criticized and appeared in the translation process mainly to explain purely ideological features. The primary use of the domesticated method of translation depended not on the personal tastes of the translators or current tendencies but on an artificial ideologically influenced cultural environment which was almost completely isolated from foreign cultures. The whole translation process in the Soviet Union differed greatly from that in democratic societies. It was inevitably influenced by an institution of censorship and strict centralization. However, we find intense efforts made bytranslators to preserve and even expand the horizons of the readers, to maintain a minimal cultural level, and to circumvent censorship.
Keywords: translation, Soviet Union, ideology, censorship, domesticated translation, foreignized translation, ideology
Published: 16.05.2017; Views: 746; Downloads: 269
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9.
Translating recurrences in Pinter's plays
Tomaž Onič, 2005, original scientific article

Abstract: Certain elements of language often repeat in all genres and at all levels of formality, whether spoken or written. This phenomenon, either premeditated or applied intuitively, always has a reason, despite the fact that the speaker (or writer) is not necessarily aware of it. A re-appearance of a certain word or word cluster is called recurrence. According to various definitions, it can be the direct repetition of a textual element which has appeared before in the text, the re-appearance of a certain word in the form of a different part of speech, or the repetition of a word cluster in which at least some elements of the original sentence repeat in the same or similar form. The term repetition is not used because only seldom is a repetition of a part of a text a real repetition, carrying exacctly the same meaning potential of the repeated phrase as did its first appearance. This element of language is often disregarded in translation. It's importance is even greater in texts where recurrences are common or, as in Pinter's plays, they represent one of the important elements of the author's style. Hopefully, this paper will raise awareness of how important it is to consider this element in translation.
Keywords: translation, translating, drama, drama translation, recurrence, Harold Pinter
Published: 16.05.2017; Views: 667; Downloads: 287
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10.
Translating culture
Kristina Kočan, 2015, original scientific article

Abstract: The paper interrogates cultural specifics of contemporary African American poetry and exhibits translation problems when translating this poetic work. African American writers have always included much of their cultural heritage in their writing and this is immediately noticed by a translator. The cultural elements, such as African American cuisine, attire and style in general, as well as spiritual and religious practices, often play a significant role for African American poets who are proclaiming their identity. Moreover, the paper presents the translation problems that emerge when attempting to transfer such a specific, even exotic, source culture into a target culture, like Slovene. The goal is to show to what extent contemporary African American poetry can successfully be translated into the Slovene language and to highlight the parts that inevitably remain lost in the translation process.
Keywords: African American poetry, African American culture, translation, source culture, target culture
Published: 16.05.2017; Views: 606; Downloads: 117
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