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1.
Exocytosis of insulin in vivo maturation of mouse endocrine pancreas
Aldo Rozzo, Tiziana Meneghel-Rozzo, Saška Lipovšek Delakorda, Shi-Bing Yang, Marjan Rupnik, 2009, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: The aim of this study was to define when an insulin-positive cell becomes functional in vivo and starts to exocytose insulin in a regulated nutrient-dependent manner. Insulin-positive cells appear in embryonic life (midgestation) and complete their maturation, presumably around birth. In order to work with embryonic and newborn endocrine pancreas, we used organotypic slices. The mouse embryonic pancreas slices show high basal insulin release that is not further elevated by high glucose levels. Despite the presence of functional voltage-activated ion channels, the cells are not electrically active in the presence of secretagogues. At birth, the high basalinsulin release drops and, after postnatal day 2, the insulin-positive cells show both adult-like bursting electrical activity and hormone release induced by high glucose levels. These properties allowed us to define them as beta cells. Despite the apparent stability of the transcription factor profile reported in insulin-positive cells during late-embryonic life, functional beta cells appear only 2 days after birth.
Keywords: cell biology, insulin release, embrios, newborn, beta-cell maturation, developing pancreas
Published: 07.06.2012; Views: 528; Downloads: 5
URL Full text (0,00 KB)

2.
Glucose-stimulated calcium dynamics in Islets of Langerhans in acute mouse pancreas tissue slices
Andraž Stožer, Jurij Dolenšek, Marjan Rupnik, 2013, original scientific article

Abstract: In endocrine cells within islets of Langerhans calcium ions couple cell stimulation to hormone secretion. Since the advent of modern fluorimetry, numerous in vitro studies employing primarily isolated mouse islets have investigated the effects of various secretagogues on cytoplasmic calcium, predominantly in insulin-secreting beta cells. Due to technical limitations, insights of these studies are inherently limited to a rather small subpopulation of outermost cells. The results also seem to depend on various factors, like culture conditions and duration, and are not always easily reconcilable with findings in vivo. The main controversies regard the types ofcalcium oscillations, presence of calcium waves, and the level of synchronized activity. Here, we set out to combine the in situ acute mouse pancreas tissue slice preparation with noninvasive fluorescent calcium labeling and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy to shed new light on the existing controversies utilizing an innovative approach enabling the characterization of responses in many cells from all layers of islets. Our experiments reproducibly showed stable fast calcium oscillations on a sustained plateau rather than slow oscillations as the predominant type of response in acute tissue slices, and that calcium waves are the mechanistic substrate for synchronization of oscillations. We also found indirect evidencethat even a large amplitude calcium signal was not sufficient and thatmetabolic activation was necessary to ensure cell synchronization upon stimulation with glucose. Our novel method helped resolve existing controversies and showed the potential to help answer important physiological questions, making it one of the methods of choice for the foreseeable future.
Keywords: glucose, pancreas, islets of Langerhans, mice
Published: 10.07.2015; Views: 290; Downloads: 10
.pdf Full text (2,83 MB)

3.
Intracellular serotonin modulates insulin secretion from pancreatic ß-cells by protein serotonylation
Nils Paulmann, Maik Grohmann, Jörg-Peter Voigt, Bettina Bert, Jakob Vowinckel, Michael Bader, Maša Skelin, Marko Jevšek, Heidrun Fink, Marjan Rupnik, Diego Walther, 2009, original scientific article

Abstract: While serotonin (5-HT) co-localization with insulin in granules of pancreatic ß-cells was demonstrated more than three decades ago, its physiological role in the etiology of diabetes is stili unclear. We combined biochemical and electrophysiological analyses of mice selectively deficient in peripheral tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph1-/-) and 5-HT to show that intracellular 5-HT regulates insulin secretion. We found that these mice are diabetic and have an impaired insulin secretion due to the lack of 5-HT in the pancreas. The pharmacological restoration of peripheral 5-HT levels rescued the impaired insulin secretion in vivo. These findings were further evidenced by patch clamp experiments with isolated Tph1-/- ß-cells, which clearly showed that the secretory defect is downstream of Ca2+ -signaling and can be rescued by direct intracellular application of 5-HT via the clamp pipette. In elucidating the underlying mechanism further, we demonstrate the covalent coupling of 5-HT by transglutaminases during insulin exocytosis to two key players in insulin secretion, the small GTPases Rab3a and Rab27a. This renders them constitutively active in a receptor-independent signaling mechanism we have recently termed serotonylation. Concordantly, an inhibition of such activating serotonylation in ß-cells abates insulin secretion. We also observed inactivation of serotonylated Rab3a by enhanced proteasomal degradation, which is in line with the inactivation of other serotonylated GTPases. Our results demonstrate that 5-HT regulates insulin secretion by serotonylation of GTPases within pancreatic ß-cells and suggest that intracellular 5-HT functions in various microenvironments via this mechanism in concert with the known receptor-mediated signaling.
Keywords: insulin secretion, serotonin, insulin, glucose, diabetes mellitus, guanosine triphosphatase, exocytosis, pancreas
Published: 16.06.2017; Views: 206; Downloads: 9
.pdf Full text (774,75 KB)

4.
Membrane potential and calcium dynamics in beta cells from mouse pancreas tissue slices
Marjan Rupnik, Andraž Stožer, Jurij Dolenšek, Borut Žalik, Maša Skelin, Marko Gosak, Denis Špelič, 2015, review article

Abstract: Beta cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are precise biological sensors for glucose and play a central role in balancing the organism between catabolic and anabolic needs. A hallmark of the beta cell response to glucose are oscillatory changes of membrane potential that are tightly coupled with oscillatory changes in intracellular calcium concentration which, in turn, elicit oscillations of insulin secretion. Both membrane potential and calcium changes spread from one beta cell to the other in a wave-like manner. In order to assess the properties of the abovementioned responses to physiological and pathological stimuli, the main challenge remains how to effectively measure membrane potential and calcium changes at the same time with high spatial and temporal resolution, and also in as many cells as possible. To date, the most wide-spread approach has employed the electrophysiological patch-clamp method to monitor membrane potential changes. Inherently, this technique has many advantages, such as a direct contact with the cell and a high temporal resolution. However, it allows one to assess information from a single cell only. In some instances, this technique has been used in conjunction with CCD camera-based imaging, offering the opportunity to simultaneously monitor membrane potential and calcium changes, but not in the same cells and not with a reliable cellular or subcellular spatial resolution. Recently, a novel family of highly-sensitive membrane potential reporter dyes in combination with high temporal and spatial confocal calcium imaging allows for simultaneously detecting membrane potential and calcium changes in many cells at a time. Since the signals yielded from both types of reporter dyes are inherently noisy, we have developed complex methods of data denoising that permit for visualization and pixel-wise analysis of signals. Combining the experimental approach of high-resolution imaging with the advanced analysis of noisy data enables novel physiological insights and reassessment of current concepts in unprecedented detail.
Keywords: calcium sensors, membrane potential sensors, calcium imaging, membrane potential imaging, beta cell, pancreas, denoising, patch-clamp
Published: 22.06.2017; Views: 151; Downloads: 15
.pdf Full text (4,17 MB)

5.
Functional connectivity in islets of Langerhans from mouse pancreas tissue slices
Jurij Dolenšek, Matjaž Perc, Marko Marhl, Marjan Rupnik, Dean Korošak, Andraž Stožer, Marko Gosak, 2013, original scientific article

Abstract: We propose a network representation of electrically coupled beta cells in islets of Langerhans. Beta cells are functionally connected on the basis of correlations between calcium dynamics of individual cells, obtained by means of confocal laser-scanning calcium imaging in islets from acute mouse pancreastissue slices. Obtained functional networks are analyzed in the light of known structural and physiological properties of islets. Focusing on the temporal evolution of the network under stimulation with glucose, we show thatthe dynamics are more correlated under stimulation than under non-stimulated conditions and that the highest overall correlation, largely independent of Euclidean distances between cells, is observed in the activation and deactivation phases when cells are driven by the external stimulus. Moreover, we find that the range of interactions in networks during activity shows a clear dependence on the Euclidean distance, lending support to previous observations that beta cells are synchronized via calcium waves spreading throughout islets. Most interestingly, the functional connectivity patterns between beta cells exhibit small-world properties, suggesting that beta cells do not form a homogeneous geometric network but are connected in a functionally more efficient way. Presented results provide support for the existing knowledge of beta cell physiology from a network perspective and shedimportant new light on the functional organization of beta cell syncitia whose structural topology is probably not as trivial as believed so far.
Keywords: islets of Langerhans, mouse pancreas
Published: 16.06.2017; Views: 243; Downloads: 10
.pdf Full text (798,57 KB)

6.
The relationship between membrane potential and calcium dynamics in glucose-stimulated beta cell syncytium in acute mouse pancreas tissue slices
Jurij Dolenšek, Andraž Stožer, Maša Skelin, Evan Miller, Marjan Rupnik, 2013, original scientific article

Abstract: Oscillatory electrical activity is regarded as a hallmark of the pancreatic beta cell glucose-dependent excitability pattern. Electrophysiologically recorded membrane potential oscillations in beta cells are associated with in-phase oscillatory cytosolic calcium activity ([Ca2+]i) measured with fluorescent probes. Recent high spatial and temporal resolution confocal imaging revealed that glucose stimulation of beta cells in intact islets within acute tissue slices produces a [Ca2+]i change with initial transient phase followed by a plateau phase with highly synchronized [Ca2+]i oscillations. Here, we aimed to correlate the plateau [Ca2+]i oscillations with the oscillations of membrane potential using patch-clamp and for the first time high resolution voltage-sensitive dye based confocal imaging. Our results demonstrated that the glucose-evoked membrane potential oscillations spread over the islet in a wave-like manner, their durations and wave velocities being comparable to the ones for [Ca2+]i oscillations and waves. High temporal resolution simultaneous records of membrane potential and [Ca2+]i confirmed tight but nevertheless limited coupling of the two processes, with membrane depolarization preceding the [Ca2+]i increase. The potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium increased the velocity at which oscillations advanced over the islet by several-fold while, at the same time, emphasized differences in kinetics of the membrane potential and the [Ca2+]i. The combination of both imaging techniques provides a powerful tool that will help us attain deeper knowledge of the beta cell network.
Keywords: glucose, pancreas, mice
Published: 19.06.2017; Views: 172; Downloads: 5
.pdf Full text (2,57 MB)

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