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1.
ATTITUDES OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS OF SLOVENE SPEAKERS TOWARD ENGLISH
Laura Gerenčer, 2011, undergraduate thesis

Abstract: English is the most widely spread language of today's world. Its functions exceed the ones of a lingua franca, as it is not used only for the purpose of international communication, but is also more and more widely used within non-English-speaking countries in different domains. Thus English exerts a great influence on other languages, their lexis, syntax, orthography and cultural aspect. All this brings up certain attitudes towards the language. Language attitudes are opinions, ways of thinking, feeling and reacting toward a language or its speakers, and can significantly affect people’s behaviour. The purpose of this paper was to research the attitudes of three different age groups of Slovene speakers toward English. In the theoretical part the theory behind language attitudes, the current status of English and its presence in Slovenia are presented. In the empirical part the results of the questionnaire, which was filled out by four different groups – the 8th grade pupils, the students of English, the students of other study programmes and the adult learners of English – three age groups in total, are analysed and interpreted.
Keywords: the English language, language attitudes, lingua franca, World English, World Englishes
Published: 05.09.2011; Views: 1631; Downloads: 96
.pdf Full text (1,08 MB)

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Euro-English in the European Commission: Language Use and Attitudes
Tina Balič, 2016, doctoral dissertation

Abstract: This dissertation deals with a sociolinguistic analysis of attitudes towards Euro-English (E-E), denoting a specific variety of the English language as is primarily used within the multicultural and multilingual professional contexts of the European Union (EU) institutions. Particularly within the European Commission (EC) English has acquired the role of the primary working language. This is apparent from the most recent figures provided by its translation service, according to which as many as 81.3% of source documents were written in English in 2014 (as compared to 77.6% in 2012 and 62% in 2004), followed by French with only 5%. Consequently, 285 EC representatives from different EU member states were surveyed on their attitudes towards E-E, primarily focusing on those respondents whose mother tongues are not English. Crucially, they were asked to evaluate several sentences that deviated from Standard English according to their perceptions of what is acceptable English usage and what is not. Beforehand, a corpus-based analysis was conducted in order to determine which potentially E-E features to integrate within the acceptability test. Importantly, the authors of the examined EU material are deemed congruent as much as possible with the participants of the attitudinal analysis, as they all work for one of the main EU institutions. The main findings reveal that the high acceptability rates of the proposed deviant sentences among the surveyed non-native English-speaking EC representatives were primarily related to their lower proficiency in the English language and/or mother tongue interference, whereas we argue that the surveyed native speakers accepted most of them because they failed to apply a known language system accurately. Accordingly, we found out that the participants as a whole generally adhere to native models of English, i.e. British English, and thus do not personally endorse a European variety of English as a standard of linguistic correctness in their minds. Although specific usage that differs from the standard use of English has to an extent been developed within the EU institutions, the identified features must be regarded as EU jargon; which may be more or less obvious; rather than a particular E-E variety already expressing common EU culture and identity. We conclude that an independent variety of English, comparable to the Inner or Outer Circle Englishes, neither exists to date nor is in its earliest stage of development within the EU institutions.
Keywords: sociolinguistics; attitudes towards language; Euro-English; lingua franca; European Commission; working language; corpus linguistics; linguistic features; competence in English.
Published: 13.06.2016; Views: 509; Downloads: 80
.pdf Full text (5,78 MB)

5.
Attitudes towards Euro-English in a European Union institution
Tina Balič, 2016, original scientific article

Abstract: This study deals with the attitudinal aspect of Euro-English, denoting a specific form of the English language that is frequently used within the institutions of the European Union. A questionnaire survey was conducted among 285 representatives who work for one of these institutions in Brussels. The respondents were asked to rate several deviations from Standard English, identified in a corpus-based analysis of EU texts, as either "acceptable" or "unacceptable" English usage. The findings reveal that the high acceptability rates of the proposed features among the non-native English-speaking respondents were mainly related to their proficiency in English and/or mother tongue interference. Moreover, since native speakers of English also accepted most of the proposed deviations, it follows that the participants did not seem to be aware of non-standardness in the test sentences. Euro-English must be regarded as EU jargon due to its technical, administrative or legal nature and not as a separate non-standard form of English for EU institutional settings.
Keywords: European Union institution, Euro-English, corpus linguistics, deviations from Standard English, attitudes towards language, Eurojargon
Published: 12.05.2017; Views: 331; Downloads: 159
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Pre-service teachers' attitude towards learning and teaching English to young learners
Silva Bratož, 2015, original scientific article

Abstract: Considerable attention has recently been invested into researching the influence of affective variables, such as attitudes and motivation on foreign language learning and teaching. The topic is timely and relevant especially at the time when English is being introduced as an obligatory subject in the first cycle of primary school in Slovenia. Two key issues are addressed: attitudes towards learning and teaching English as a foreign language and the profile of the young learners' language teacher. The article presents the results of a small-scale research conducted with a group of primary education students on their attitudes towards learning and teaching English. The results suggest that trainee teachers have moderately positive attitudes towards learning English but diverse attitudes towards teaching a foreign language.
Keywords: English as a foreign language, pre-service teachers, attitudes, motivation, young language learners
Published: 22.09.2017; Views: 198; Downloads: 43
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7.
Students' attitudes towards their EFL lessons and teachers
Mojca Žefran, 2015, original scientific article

Abstract: The article investigates attitudes towards English as a foreign language (EFL) by focusing on retrospective accounts of higher-education students' experience with learning English. The first part looks at individual factors affecting foreign language (FL) learning, such as attitudes towards FL learning and FL anxiety. The second part presents the results of a study conducted among students of the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Primorska. The main aim of the study was to identify students' attitudes towards their past EFL lessons and teachers and students' FL anxiety level. The results show that anxiety is a serious problem and that students exhibit alarmingly negative attitudes towards EFL lessons and teachers.
Keywords: learning anxiety, foreign language anxiety, attitudes towards foreign language instruction, attitudes towards EFL teachers, English language
Published: 03.10.2017; Views: 298; Downloads: 42
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