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1.
Intertextuality, Adaptation and Appropriation in Michael Cunnigham’s Novel The Hours
Špela Mosbruker, 2016, master's thesis

Abstract: The graduation thesis presents Michael Cunningham's The Hours. The novel is a Postmodernist work, based on Virginia Woolf's modernist novel Mrs Dalloway. The thesis explores the intertextual relations between the two works and discovers features of adaptation and appropriation. The intertextual analysis is based on several original intertexts: Mrs Dalloway, Woolf’s letters and her life itself. The characteristics of The Hours as an intertextual work, as adaptation and appropriation are supported with examples from the text and with theories by Gerard Genette, Julie Sanders and Linda Hutcheon. Intertextuality is divided into quotation, allusion and paratextuality in the thesis; adaptation is illustrated with specific examples, and appropriation is discussed within the frames of a riff and other imitation features of The Hours. The thesis deals with several elements of The Hours, such as motifs, themes, names of the characters, imitation of Woolf’s style and settings which are presented as intertextual examples or/and as characteristics of adaptation and appropriation. In accordance with Postmodernist principles, the importance of the reader is stressed in order for him/her to perceive the intertextual, adaptive and appropriated features of the novel. The Hours can be perceived as intertextual work or as adaptation and/or appropriation.
Keywords: The Hours, Mrs Dalloway, intertextuality, adaptation, appropriation, postmodernism, modernism.
Published: 25.03.2016; Views: 1106; Downloads: 113
.pdf Full text (818,11 KB)

2.
Disturbing the balance - Woody Allen reads Dostoyevsky
Michał Bobrowski, 2011, original scientific article

Abstract: This paper discusses the polemic, intertextual correspondence which occurs between Woody Allen’s drama Crimes and Misdemeanors and Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov. Through a comparative analysis, the author reveals structural analogies between both works, but also fundamental ideological differences. Dostoyevky’s approach to the subject of the moral consequences of rejection of religious faith was that of a follower of the Orthodox faith. For Allen, a similar topic became the pretext for deliberations on man’s existential solitude.
Keywords: literature, film, intertextuality, Orthodox faith, Fjodor M. Dostoevsky, Brothers Karamazov, Woody Allen, Crimes and Misdemeanors, essays, ethics
Published: 06.02.2018; Views: 204; Downloads: 196
.pdf Full text (411,40 KB)
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