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1.
Determination of lower bound fracture toughness of a high strength low alloy steel welded joint
Nenad Gubeljak, 2005, original scientific article

Abstract: The use of high-strength low-alloy steels for high performance structures (e.g. pressure vessels and pipelines) requires high strength consumables to produce an overmatched welded joint. This globally overmatched multipass welded joint contains two significantly different microstructures, as welded and reheated. In this paper, the influence of weld metal microstructure on fracture behaviour is estimated in comparison with the fracture behaviour of composite microstructures (as welded and reheated). The lower bound of fracture toughness for different microstructures was evaluated by using the modified Weibull distortion. The results, obtained using specimens with crack front through the thickness, indicated low fracture toughness, caused by strength mismatching interaction along thevcrck front. In the case of through thickness specimens, at least one local brittle microstructure is incorporatedin the process zone at the vicinity of the crck tip. Hence, unstable fracture occurred with small or without stable crack propagation. Despite the fact that the differences between the impact toughness of a weld metal and that of base metal are insignificant, the future toughness of a weld metal can be significantly lower.
Keywords: welded joints, fracture mechanics, Crack tip opening displacement, high strength seeel weld, mismatch effects, fracture toughness, resistance curves
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 1150; Downloads: 57
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2.
Crack tip shielding or anti-shielding due to smooth and discontinuous material inhomogeneities
N.K. Simha, Franz Dieter Fischer, Otmar Kolednik, Jožef Predan, G.X. Shan, 2005, original scientific article

Abstract: This paper describes a theoretical model and related computational methods forexamining the influence of inhomogeneous material properties on the crack driving force in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. Following the configurational forces approach, the crack tip shielding or anti-shielding dueto smooth (e.g. graded layer) and discontinuous (e.g. bimaterial interface)distributions in material properties are derived. Computational post-processing methods are described to evaluate these inhomogeneity effects.The utility of the theoretical model and computational methods is demonstrated by examining a bimaterial interface perpendicular to a crack in elastic and elastic-plastic compact tension specimens.
Keywords: fracture mechanics, fracture toughness, composite materials, layered material, inhomogeneity, cracks, finite element method, elastic bimaterials
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 1093; Downloads: 46
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3.
On fracture behaviour of inhomogeneous materials - a case study for elastically inhomogeneous bimaterials
Otmar Kolednik, Jožef Predan, G.X. Shan, N.K. Simha, Franz Dieter Fischer, 2005, original scientific article

Abstract: This paper presents a case study, examining the influence of a sharp bimaterial interface on the effective crack driving force in a fracture mechanics specimen. The inhomogeneity of the elastic modulus in linear elasticand non-hardening and hardening elastic-plastic bimaterials is considered. The interface is perpendicular to the crack plane. The material properties and the distance between the crack tip and the interface are systematically varied. The effect of the material inhomogeneity is captured in form of a quantity called "material inhomogeneity term",▫$C_inh$▫. This term can be evaluated either by a simple post-processing procedure, following a conventional finite element stress analysis, or by computing the J-integral along a contour around the interface, ▫$J_int$▫. The effective crack driving force,▫$J_tip$▫, can be determined as the sum of ▫$C_inh$▫ and the nominally applied far-field crack driving force, ▫$J_far$▫. The results show that ▫$C_inh$▫ can be accurately determined by both methods even in cases where ▫$J_tip$▫-values are inaccurate. When a crack approaches a stiff/compliant interface,▫$C_inh$▫ is positive and ▫$J_tip$▫ becomes larger than ▫$J-far$▫. A compliant/stiff transition leads to a negative ▫$C_inh$▫, and ▫J_tip$▫ becomes smaller than ▫$J_far$▫. The material inhomogeneity term, ▫$C_inh$▫, can have the same order of magnitude as ▫$J_far$▫. Based on the numerical results, the dependencies of ▫$C_inh$▫ on the material parameters and the geometry are derived. Simple expressions are obtained to estimate ▫$C_inh$▫.
Keywords: mechanics of structures, fracture toughness, inhomogeneous materials, J-integral, crack driving force, interface, material force
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 783; Downloads: 9
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4.
Assessment of the load-bearing capacity of a primary pipeline
Nenad Gubeljak, Jelena Vojvodič-Tuma, Borivoj Šuštaršič, Jožef Predan, Maks Oblak, 2007, original scientific article

Abstract: High-alloyed Cr-Ni-based two-phase stainless steel (SS) cast alloys are commonly used in nuclear power plants. The mechanical equipment in these facilities can contribute to a reduction in its resistance to stable crack growth as a result of extended operating times and high temperatures. The toughness of these materials strongly depends on their delta (▫$/delta$▫) ferrite content, which spinodally decomposes into two phases with different ratios of Cr and Ni at a relatively low (slightly above 300 °C) temperature. This temperature is similar to the operating temperature of the vital parts, for example, the coolant system. The formation of two phases with the same crystalstructure but different lattice parameters causes internal elastic stresses that result in a hardness increase and an impact-toughness decrease. The result is an increased risk of crack formation in the stress-concentration zones such as the critical regions of different welded joints (e.g. "L, T, K and X" shapes). The values of the critical stress intensity factor change according to its position along the crack contour. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the influence of the materials' changes on the crack extension and the decrease of the primary pipeline's bearing capacity by taking account of the increased temperature and time of operation for the given loading conditions. The SINTAP (European Structural Integrity Assessment Procedure) was used for this assessment.
Keywords: welding, welded joints, pipelines, fracture toughness testing, structure integrity assessment procedure
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 982; Downloads: 44
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5.
The pre-cracking of wide plate specimens
Vladimir Gliha, Danilo Rojko, 2003, original scientific article

Abstract: The behaviour of uniformly thick small- and large-scale fracture-toughness specimens was analysed during fatigue-crack progression. Because of the increasing crack length, the stiffness of the specimens decreases. If cyclic loading is applied in the load-control mode, the stress-intensity factor range, ▫$Delta$▫K, and crack growth per cycle, da/dN, increase, which is not appropriate for controlling the size of the crack. The increase in ▫$Delta$▫K for the wide plate (WP) specimens discussed is three times lower than for single edge notch bend (SENB) and compact tension (CT) specimens. The loading range decreases if cyclic loading is applied in the displacement-control mode. The values of ▫$Delta$▫K and da/dN for SENB and CT specimens then decrease, which is helpful for controlling the crack size; however, they increase for the WP specimens in spite of lowering the loading range. This increase is one third lower than for the load-control mode, which means that it is somewhat easier to control the size of crack.
Keywords: fracture toughness, specimen, pre-cracking, fatigue crak, crack size, stress intensity factor
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 1087; Downloads: 57
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6.
The fracture behaviour of global/local mis-matched weld joints provided on HSLA steels
Inoslav Rak, Nenad Gubeljak, Zdravko Praunseis, 2001, original scientific article

Abstract: The fracture behaviour of thick section high strength steel weldments, that contain soft root passes, has been studied. Two different weld consumables with different strength mismatch (1>M>1) and fracture toughness properties in the WM have significantly increased the complexity of the mis-match effect and failure behaviour of weld joints, depending on the crack location and the thickness of the soft root layer. The aim was to explain the effect of strength heterogeneity between BM and WM and between different regions in WM (global/local mismatching). R-curves of WM and HAZ regions were also discussed. The conclusion is that the application of a welding procedure with a two-pass soft root layer, introduced for the purpose of reducing or even omitting preheating, can be recommended in mis-matched weld joints on steel grade HT80. Nevertheless, the alloying from BM, and the tempering effect of subsequent weld passes, have to be taken into account. They can cause reduction of the root region ductility and affect the local mismatch in WM and HAZ. The deterioration by providing a soft root layer can probably be reduced by a selected consumable and proper welding procedure. The final conclusion is that the application of a mismatched weld joint with a soft root layer can be recommended only if high root toughness can be provided.
Keywords: welding, welded joints, strength mismatching, fracture toughness, CTOD, hardness, impact toughness, HSLA steels
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 1160; Downloads: 56
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7.
Fracture toughness of heterogeneous energy components
Zdravko Praunseis, 2012, original scientific article

Abstract: The presence of different microstructures along pre-crack fatigue fronts has important effects on the critical crack tip opening displacement (CTOD). This value is the relevant parameter for the safe servicing of energy components (penstocks). In the case of specimens with a through thickness notch partly in the weld metal, partly in the heat affected zone and partly in the base material, i.e. using the composite notched specimen, the fracture behaviour strongly depends on the portion of ductile base material, its size and the distribution of the mismatching factor along the vicinity of the crack front.
Keywords: fracture toughness, energy materials, experimental testing
Published: 10.07.2015; Views: 557; Downloads: 26
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8.
An integrity analysis of washing machine holders
Nenad Gubeljak, Matej Mejač, Jožef Predan, 2007, original scientific article

Abstract: The paper deals with structure integrity analysis of the holder for the carrying cross of a washing machine drum. Premature fracture of the holder occurred between mechanical sustainable tests of washing machine in the factory. In order to prevent fracture, the task was to determine the reasons for premature fracture of the holder and to estimate the suitability of the new design of the holder cross. Input data for structure integriry analysis were obtained by material by mechanical testing of used materials. Stress and strain analysis of holder limit load was performed by finite element modeling of holder. Dynamic tests of holders with two different thicknesses were done on a servo-hydraulic machine in order to find dynamical strength and endurance of holder. Fracture behaviour of holders is defined as initiation and propagation of crack. The obtained behaviour confirmed that the new design of holders reduces stress concentration in the critical region. Consequently, the new holder subjected to the same dynamic load can endure a higher number of cycles until breakage. The total number of cycles overcomes industrial testing requirements.
Keywords: lomna mehanika, visokociklično utrujanje, preizkušanje lomne žilavosti, nosilci kadi pralnega stroja, mejna obremenitev, ocena celovitosti konstrukcije, fracture mechanics, high cycle fatigue, fracture toughness testing, washing machine holders, washing machine drums, structure integrity assessment, limit load
Published: 10.07.2015; Views: 547; Downloads: 45
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9.
Role of residual stresses on fracture properties of under-matched butt weld
Inoslav Rak, Vladimir Gliha, 1999, original scientific article

Abstract: Under-matched weld joints were adopted for producing a penstock of 47 mm wall thickness and 4200 mm diameter, to improve the weldability. The isothermal Robertson wide plate test on the under-matched weld joints, were the allowable stress level was 0.6 of the yield stress, proved that the longitudinal stresses caused the crack propagation alog the weld joint to deviate into tough base material where it was arrested. The arrest temperature was between -10 and -20°C. The behaviour of the crack propagation was the reason to omit the thermal stress relieving of the pipe section and on circumferential weld joints executed on this side. One can always take into consideration the role of axial residual stresses when assessing whether to use, or not, under-matched weld joints in severer loaded structures.
Keywords: strjeni zvar z nižjo mejo tečenja, zaostale napetosti, potek loma, lastnosti ujetja, lomna žilavost, under-matched weld joint, residual stresses, fracture path, arrest properties, fracture toughness
Published: 10.07.2015; Views: 646; Downloads: 17
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10.
Weld joint fracture behaviour of HSLA steels dissimilar in strength
Inoslav Rak, Arpad Treiber, 1998, original scientific article

Abstract: The effect of strength differences (mismatch) between weld metal and two base metals as well as local variations of strength within weld metal/HAZ zones on the toughness properties were discussed. The significance of local fracture toughness measurement technique was also discussed by comparing the CTOD results of [delta]5 and British Standard [delta]BS. Some differences between the two techniqes were discussed in particular for CGHAZ toughness of similar and dissimilar joints.
Keywords: welding, welded joints, fracture mechanics, HSLA steels, fracture toughness
Published: 10.07.2015; Views: 545; Downloads: 16
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