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1.
Separation of peptides with forward osmosis biomimetic membranes
Niada Bajraktari, Henrik T. Madsen, Mathias F. Gruber, Sigurd Truelsen, Elzbieta L. Jensen, Henrik Jensen, Claus Hélix-Nielsen, 2016, original scientific article

Abstract: Forward osmosis (FO) membranes have gained interest in several disciplines for the rejection and concentration of various molecules. One application area for FO membranes that is becoming increasingly popular is the use of the membranes to concentrate or dilute high value compound solutions such as pharmaceuticals. It is crucial in such settings to control the transport over the membrane to avoid losses of valuable compounds, but little is known about the rejection and transport mechanisms of larger biomolecules with often flexible conformations. In this study, transport of two chemically similar peptides with molecular weight (Mw) of 375 and 692 Da across a thin film composite Aquaporin Inside™ Membrane (AIM) FO membrane was investigated. Despite the relative large size, both peptides were able to permeate the dense active layer of the AIM membrane and the transport mechanism was determined to be diffusion-based. Interestingly, the membrane permeability increased 3.65 times for the 692 Da peptide (1.39 × 10−12 m2·s−1) compared to the 375 Da peptide (0.38 × 10−12 m2·s−1). This increase thus occurs for an 85% increase in Mw but only for a 34% increase in peptide radius of gyration (Rg) as determined from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This suggests that Rg is a strong influencing factor for membrane permeability. Thus, an increased Rg reflects the larger peptide chains ability to sample a larger conformational space when interacting with the nanostructured active layer increasing the likelihood for permeation.
Keywords: forward osmosis, biomimetic, peptides, rejection
Published: 21.06.2017; Views: 411; Downloads: 275
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2.
Forward osmosis in wastewater treatment processes
Jasmina Korenak, Subhankar Basu, Malini Balakrishnan, Claus Hélix-Nielsen, Irena Petrinić, 2017, original scientific article

Abstract: In recent years, membrane technology has been widely used in wastewater treatment and water purification. Membrane technology is simple to operate and produces very high quality water for human consumption and industrial purposes. One of the promising technologies for water and wastewater treatment is the application of forward osmosis. Essentially, forward osmosis is a process in which water is driven through a semipermeable membrane from a feed solution to a draw solution due to the osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane. The immediate advantage over existing pressure driven membrane technologies is that the forward osmosis process per se eliminates the need for operation with high hydraulic pressure and forward osmosis has low fouling tendency. Hence, it provides an opportunity for saving energy and membrane replacement cost. However, there are many limitations that still need to be addressed. Here we briefly review some of the applications within water purification and new developments in forward osmosis membrane fabrication.
Keywords: wastewater treatment, biomimetic membranes, desalination, draw solutions, forward osmosis
Published: 18.08.2017; Views: 572; Downloads: 258
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3.
Biomimetic membranes for forward osmosis application in industrial wastewater treatment
Jasmina Korenak, 2018, doctoral dissertation

Abstract: The problem of wastewater is increasing as we face tighter regulations in limiting parameters for discharge into sewers or surface waters. At the same time, the challenge is also how to upgrade existing technology and identify new appropriate technologies for purification of industrial wastewater for re-use. The optimal solution, which can give the appropriate quality of purified water at acceptable operating costs also is not straightforward. However, increasing environmental legislative demands combined with increased fresh water consumption can facilitate implementation of emerging technologies which at the current state are not fully mature. Forward Osmosis (FO) is one such recent achievement which is considered as a promising membrane process and potentially a sustainable alternative to reverse osmosis (RO) process for wastewater reclamation and sea/brackish water desalination. However, there are many limiting parameters (e.g. membrane fouling, draw solutions) in FO process that needs to be studied and improved. To reduce the membrane fouling in FO, many improvements were attempted, e.g. synthesis of different membrane materials, fabrication of membrane modules, membrane coating etc. One of the novelties in membrane development research field is biomimetic membranes incorporate in separation processes. They employ natural proteins known as AQPs (aqpourins) to regulate the flow of water, providing increased permeability and near-perfect solute rejection. Membrane surface characteristics were measured on virgin, used and cleane membrane in order to confirm the resistance to different types of industrial wastewater and sewage.
Keywords: biomimetic membrane, forward osmosis, industrial wastewater, reverse osmosis, textile wastewater, ultrafiltration, wastewater reuse
Published: 25.07.2018; Views: 809; Downloads: 65
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4.
Hollow-Fibre forward osmosis membrane module stress tests
Urban Gselman, 2020, undergraduate thesis

Abstract: Humanity has recently begun to realize that resources on Earth are not infinite and that, consequently, it is imperative for us to start to use them sustainably and renewably. Aligned with this mentality, forward osmosis has been rigorously studied in the past few decades with some commercially available products already on the market. This thesis used one of those products, namely, the Aquaporin HFFO 2 membrane module, and assessed its stability in sodium metabisulfite solution and high salinity without flowing solutions under long-term storage conditions. The sodium metabisulfite preservation part was devised to upgrade the existing guidelines for prolonged storage of fouled membranes and the osmotic drying project was looking at a scenario where the modules would be exposed to a salt solution on the draw side and no flowing wastewater on the feed side. The assessments were made on pristine HFFO 2 membrane modules and with RO water prepared on site. Their performance after exposure was measured with an internal quality control procedure, producing values for water flux, reverse salt flux, normalized reverse salt flux and temperature, which were later compared with the initial values. The findings show us that the sodium metabisulfite and increased salinity have a detrimental effect on the membrane inside of the module, but not enough to be considered damaged and would need to be discarded. More valuable results will be gained if the measurements are done on fouled membranes, as the biggest factor in increasing the lifetime of a module is preventing algal and bacterial growth
Keywords: forward osmosis, Aquaporin HFFO 2, sodium metabisulfite, osmotic drying, prolonged storage.
Published: 24.09.2020; Views: 26; Downloads: 0
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