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1.
The effect of an educational intervention in family phisicians on self-rated quality of life in patients with medically unexplained symptoms
Vojislav Ivetić, Klemen Pašić, Polona Selič, 2017, original scientific article

Abstract: Introduction: Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are very common in family medicine, despite being a poorly-defined clinical entity. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an educational intervention (EI) on self-rated quality of life, treatment satisfaction, and the family physician-patient relationship in patients with MUS. Methods: In a multi-centre longitudinal intervention study, which was performed between 2012 and 2014, patients were asked to rate their quality of life, assess their depression, anxiety, stress and somatisation, complete the Hypochondriasis Index, the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale and the Patient Enablement Instrument for assessing the physician-patient relationship, before and after the EI. Results: The mean values before and after the intervention showed that after the EI, patients with MUS gave a lower (total) mean rating of their health issues and a higher rating of their quality of life, and they also had a more positive opinion of their relationship with the physician (p<0.05). However, there were no differences in the (total) rating of treatment satisfaction before and after the EI (p=0.423). Significant differences in the symptoms in patients with MUS before and after the intervention were confirmed for stress, somatisation and hypochondriasis (p<0.05). Conclusions: It could be beneficial to equip family physicians with the knowledge, skills and tools to reduce hypochondriasis and somatisation in MUS patients, which would improve patients’ self-rated health status.
Keywords: medically unexplained symptoms, family medicine, educational intervention, quality of life, treatment satisfaction, family physician-patient relationship
Published: 06.04.2017; Views: 566; Downloads: 101
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2.
Do the experiences of patients of state-employed family physicians and concessionaires in Slovenia differ?
Danica Rotar-Pavlič, Maja Sever, Zalika Klemenc-Ketiš, Igor Švab, Janko Kersnik, Wienke Boerma, 2015, original scientific article

Abstract: Background: Family practice healthcare in Slovenia is provided by state-employed family physicians as well as concessionaires. However, both work under a contract with the National Health Insurance Institute. This study focuses on comparing patients’ experiences with Slovenian concessionaires and state-employed physicians. Methods: We performed analyses using survey data from a cross-sectional study on patient experiences, which took place from September 2011 to April 2012 as a part of the international QUALICOPC study. The Slovenian branch of this study included 1,962 patients visiting family practices. Patients were classified into two groups with respect to the registered status of their family physician. They completed the questionnaires immediately aſter visiting their family physicians. Data used in the analyses included 76 variables: 18 socio-economic and 58 variables linked to the patient’s experience. Results: The analyses showed few differences between concessionaires and state-employed family physicians. In comparison with patients of state-employed family physicians, patients of concessionaires were less likely to make an appointment for a visit (19.8 % vs. 29.2 %), were generally more frequent visitors (43.7 % vs. 50.7 %), and more oſten felt that opening hours were too restricted (25.7 % vs. 31.9 %). Patients of concessionaires believed more oſten that in general, doctors can be trusted (40.1 % vs.47.1 %). A smaller percentage of patients of concessionaires felt that their physician had the capacity to deal with personal problems as well as to provide medical care (61.9 % vs. 54.7 %). Conclusions: There are few differences in patients’ experiences of state-employed family physicians and concessionaires. Slovenian patients have a generally positive experience with family practice services regardless of the family physicians’ status. Plans for organizational change of the health sector should include patients’ perceptions of services.
Keywords: patient, experience, family physician, state-employed, concessionaire
Published: 10.05.2017; Views: 355; Downloads: 85
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3.
Process quality indicators in family medicine
Danica Rotar-Pavlič, Maja Sever, Zalika Klemenc-Ketiš, Igor Švab, 2015, original scientific article

Abstract: Background: The aim of our study was to describe variability in process quality in family medicine among 31 European countries plus Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. The quality of family medicine was measured in terms of continuity, coordination, community orientation, and comprehensiveness of care. Methods: The QUALICOPC study (Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe) was carried out among family physicians in 31 European countries (the EU 27 except for France, plus Macedonia, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, and Turkey) and three non-European countries (Australia, Canada, and New Zealand). We used random sampling when national registers of practitioners were available. Regional registers or lists of facilities were used for some countries. A standardized questionnaire was distributed to the physicians, resulting in a sample of 6734 participants. Data collection took place between October 2011 and December 2013. Based on completed questionnaires, a three-dimensional framework was established to measure continuity, coordination, community orientation, and comprehensiveness of care. Multilevel linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the variation of quality attributable to the family physician level and the country level. Results: None of the 34 countries in this study consistently scored the best or worst in all categories. Continuity of care was perceived by family physicians as the most important dimension of quality. Some components of comprehensiveness of care, including medical technical procedures, preventive care and health care promotion, varied substantially between countries. Coordination of care was identified as the weakest part of quality. We found that physician-level characteristics contributed to the majority of variation. Conclusions: A comparison of process quality indicators in family medicine revealed similarities and differences within and between countries. The researchers found that the major proportion of variation can be explained by physicians' characteristics.
Keywords: family physician, process quality, comparison
Published: 28.06.2017; Views: 166; Downloads: 54
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