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31.
Recent English loanwords in Slovene
Nada Šabec, 2009, original scientific article

Abstract: The paper discusses Slovene-English language contact in general and English loanwords in Slovene in particular. The focus is on recent loanwords, where a great deal of variability in their pronunciation and spelling can be observed depending on the time of their borrowing, the channel of transmission (oral or written) and the degree of their linguistic and social integration into Slovene. Sociolinguistic variables such as the age and education of the users play a role as well, as do the differences between the phonological and orthographic systems of the two languages. In addition to phonological, morphological and orthographic aspects of English loanwords, their meaning and its occasional adaptations and modifications will be addressed. Data for illustration purposes will be taken primarily from the media, especially electronic ones (blogs, forums), since this is the field in which various forms of loanwords feature most frequently.
Keywords: loanwords, English, Slovene, vocabulary, language contact, language development, Slovene-English language contact, integration
Published: 16.05.2017; Views: 284; Downloads: 141
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32.
Some aspects of the systemic functional model in text analysis
Katja Plemenitaš, 2004, original scientific article

Abstract: The article presents some aspects of text explanation in the systemic functional model of language. In the systemic functional model text is conceived as a semantic unit created in the process of selection and realization of meaningful choices encoded in words and structures. This implies that in order to uncover what types of meanings are being encoded in the text one has to take inco account the lexico-grammatical patterns which realize it. The article treats some of the possibilities for the application of this model in a comparative text analysis involving texts in different languages. As an ilustration it presents a comparison of some aspects of the experimental function of two presidential speeches, one in English and one in Slovene. The comparison focuses on the distribution of different process types in both texts.
Keywords: functional grammar, English language, Slovene language, contrastive linguistics, comparative analyses, grammar, text analyses, lexical patterns, grammatical patterns, text explanation
Published: 16.05.2017; Views: 317; Downloads: 130
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33.
The "magnet effect" - a powerful source of L1 dialect interference in the pronunciation of English as a foreign language
Klementina Penelope Jurančič, 2014, original scientific article

Abstract: Wieden and Nemser (1991) carried out a study investigating the development of pronunciation of English as a foreign language in Austria. One of the main issues in this research was L1 dialect interference. Individual studies have proven that the pronunciation of a second (L2) or foreign language (FL) is not influenced only by the standard variety of the first language (L1), but also by the L1 dialect of the speaker's place of origin (Karpf et al. 1980). Wieden and Nemser's study wished to prove this on a larger scale. A similar study was carried out also for Slovenia (Jurančič Petek 2007). Contrastive analysis (CA) of the Slovene Standard pronunciation and English was performed as well as that of the sound systems of individual Slovene dialects and the English one. Error analysis (EA) of the obtained results showed that L1 dialect interference did not occur in the instances predicted by contrastive analysis; however the study in itself did prove the existence of such influence ("magnet effect" in vowels).
Keywords: English language, magnet effect, monophthongs, dialect interference, pronunciation, L1 dialect interference, pronunciation of English
Published: 16.05.2017; Views: 270; Downloads: 49
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34.
Developing academic vocabulary with AWL gapmaker and corpus data
Agata Križan, 2009, original scientific article

Abstract: There is a growing need for the development of at least some academic vocabulary in students of EFL (studying English for teaching and non-teaching purposes), if one of the main aims of EFL study is to produce competent users of English. Students are expected to read and understand advanced professional texts, not simply to successfully complete their degrees but to become a part of educated society, and to be able to meet the demands placed upon their knowledge in a prefessional environment. The reading and understanding of professional texts can be a highly demanding activity because of the number of academic and professional terms such texts include. This paper exemplifies the usefulness of a gap-fill exercise, as one among a range of options for developing and testing academic vocabulary in a professional context. The exercise was compiled with AWL gapmaker based on a professional review text, which includes academic items of vocabulary. The gap-fill exercise was used with two groups of EFL students in the same year of study and installed at two difficulty levels for two reasons: to test students' existing knowledge of academic vocabulary, and to enrich it through the analysis of words in context/co-text relation using a concordancing program. The paper compares the answers of both groups to determine the most problematic entries (incorrect answers), and to provide the possible reasons for them. Further, contextual clues are taken into consideration as a helpful source for determining correct entries, and tested with the concordancing program. Besides the emphasis on the usefulness of such gap-fill exercises combined with corpus for the development and enrichment of academic vocabulary, the paper also emphasizes the importance of guiding students in how to search for different grammatical and other contextual clues to make correct inferences, and how to use concordances to support or reject the claims.
Keywords: English, foreign languages, scientific language, scientific vocabulary, academic vocabulary, corpus linguistics, academic teaching, didactics
Published: 18.05.2017; Views: 311; Downloads: 88
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35.
English modal verbs in modal verb phrase structures and lexical associations of modality in "standard terms and conditions of sale"
Nataša Gajšt, 2012, original scientific article

Abstract: This paper presents the findings of a corpus-based analysis of English modal verbs and semi-modals in modal verb phrase structures as well as lexical association of modality in ʼstandard terms and conditions of saleʼ, which are legally binding documents in the domain of commerce and whose purpose is to govern the obligations and rights of sellers and buyers in the transaction of goods for payment. Our research has established that the most frequent modal verbs in these documents are shall, will, may, must and can, and that the most common modal verb phrase structures in are ʼmodal+infinitiveʼ and ʼmodal+be+past participleʼ. We found 718 different lexical verbs that indicate actions, states and conditions associated with commercial transactions. These results correspond with the definition of these documents. Our findings are a demonstration of how language expresses the characteristics of a legal text type in a professional domain of commerce/trade.
Keywords: English, business language, commercial language, standard terms and conditions of sale, modal verbs, corpus linguistics
Published: 18.05.2017; Views: 319; Downloads: 115
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36.
Sloglish or the mixing/switching of Slovene and English in Slovene blogs
Nada Šabec, 2009, original scientific article

Abstract: The article discusses the impact of the Internet on language use and, more specifically, analyzes the frequent mixing/switching of Slovene and English in Slovene blogs (so-called Sloglish). This new discourse type, combining elements of written and oral communication, is highly interactive in nature and allows for flexibility, variation and language innovation. On the other hand, some see it as too globalized and uniform as well as a threat to the language norm. Slovene blogs are analyzed linguistically (vocabulary, syntax, spelling, punctuation) and interpreted from the sociolinguistic and pragmatic perspectives (the issue of personal, cultural and social identities of bloggers; local vs. global).
Keywords: sociolinguistics, blogs, sloglist, code switching, Slovene language, English language, identity
Published: 30.05.2017; Views: 356; Downloads: 122
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37.
Students' attitudes towards the use of Slovene as L1 in teaching and learning of business English at tertiary level
Nataša Gajšt, 2017, original scientific article

Abstract: Over the past decades, the monolingual (English-only) approach to English language teaching and learning has prevailed. In recent years, however, the trend of using students' first language (L1) in teaching and learning English as a foreign language has re-emerged. However, the research on the use of L1 in teaching English for specific purposes is far from extensive. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of Slovene as the students' L1 in teaching and learning Business English at tertiary level. The specific objectives were to determine the students' attitudes towards the teachers' and the students' use of Slovene during Business English lessons and the students' use of Slovene in learning Business English. The present study was quantitative, with data gathered via a questionnaire. The results show that, on the one hand, there is some inclination towards the use of L1 both in class and during their study of Business English. On the other hand, the preference towards the use of predominantly (or exclusively) English in class is also present and is positively correlated with the level of students' knowledge of English. The results are of value to English language teachers as they suggest the contexts in which students' L1 could be used in the process of teaching and learning English for specific purposes.
Keywords: business English, foreign language study and teaching, Slovenian language, native language, didactics
Published: 09.08.2017; Views: 443; Downloads: 110
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38.
Pre-service teachers' attitude towards learning and teaching English to young learners
Silva Bratož, 2015, original scientific article

Abstract: Considerable attention has recently been invested into researching the influence of affective variables, such as attitudes and motivation on foreign language learning and teaching. The topic is timely and relevant especially at the time when English is being introduced as an obligatory subject in the first cycle of primary school in Slovenia. Two key issues are addressed: attitudes towards learning and teaching English as a foreign language and the profile of the young learners' language teacher. The article presents the results of a small-scale research conducted with a group of primary education students on their attitudes towards learning and teaching English. The results suggest that trainee teachers have moderately positive attitudes towards learning English but diverse attitudes towards teaching a foreign language.
Keywords: English as a foreign language, pre-service teachers, attitudes, motivation, young language learners
Published: 22.09.2017; Views: 182; Downloads: 40
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39.
Students' attitudes towards their EFL lessons and teachers
Mojca Žefran, 2015, original scientific article

Abstract: The article investigates attitudes towards English as a foreign language (EFL) by focusing on retrospective accounts of higher-education students' experience with learning English. The first part looks at individual factors affecting foreign language (FL) learning, such as attitudes towards FL learning and FL anxiety. The second part presents the results of a study conducted among students of the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Primorska. The main aim of the study was to identify students' attitudes towards their past EFL lessons and teachers and students' FL anxiety level. The results show that anxiety is a serious problem and that students exhibit alarmingly negative attitudes towards EFL lessons and teachers.
Keywords: learning anxiety, foreign language anxiety, attitudes towards foreign language instruction, attitudes towards EFL teachers, English language
Published: 03.10.2017; Views: 274; Downloads: 41
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40.
Encouraging Speaking Skills by Teaching Adults English as a Foreign Language
Rebeka Očko, 2018, master's thesis

Abstract: English language has become the international language of communication. It is being used in almost every company; therefore the need for English-speaking staff is increasing. Making learners speak and actively participate in order to practice and improve their speaking skills is one of the hardest tasks for a teacher. Children learn best through play, but it is also adults that learn best when stimulated by different activities that put them in authentic situations. The purpose of this thesis is to find the importance and the effect that well-structured activities have on adult-learners’ speaking skills and to what extent they contribute to their level of proficiency of the English language. The theoretical part of this thesis contains information on what affects adult’s learning of a foreign language, and approaches of teaching them. There are methods presented on how to encourage learners to speak and actively participate. It is explained how to deal with adult-learners’ errors in the most productive way and how to teach pronunciation. As the red thread of this research, there are activities listed that actively engage and motivate learners to speak. In the empirical part there are nine activities presented that were applied when teaching two courses, the beginner’s course (ten participants) and the advanced course (ten participants), during the period of one year. The research was conducted to see how these activities affected twenty learners’ speaking skills, which of the activities were the most motivating for them and which helped develop their speaking skills, while dividing between beginner learners and advanced learners. Another point of the research was to see which activities helped learners remember new vocabulary for a longer period of time. The research results are then analyzed and the improvement of learners’ speaking skills is described, while the important findings are summarized at the end of the thesis.
Keywords: adult learners of a foreign language, English language, speaking skills, encouragement, activities.
Published: 21.09.2018; Views: 114; Downloads: 17
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