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1.
Translating recurrences in Pinter's plays
Tomaž Onič, 2005, original scientific article

Abstract: Certain elements of language often repeat in all genres and at all levels of formality, whether spoken or written. This phenomenon, either premeditated or applied intuitively, always has a reason, despite the fact that the speaker (or writer) is not necessarily aware of it. A re-appearance of a certain word or word cluster is called recurrence. According to various definitions, it can be the direct repetition of a textual element which has appeared before in the text, the re-appearance of a certain word in the form of a different part of speech, or the repetition of a word cluster in which at least some elements of the original sentence repeat in the same or similar form. The term repetition is not used because only seldom is a repetition of a part of a text a real repetition, carrying exacctly the same meaning potential of the repeated phrase as did its first appearance. This element of language is often disregarded in translation. It's importance is even greater in texts where recurrences are common or, as in Pinter's plays, they represent one of the important elements of the author's style. Hopefully, this paper will raise awareness of how important it is to consider this element in translation.
Keywords: translation, translating, drama, drama translation, recurrence, Harold Pinter
Published in DKUM: 16.05.2017; Views: 1379; Downloads: 358
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2.
The reception of Harold Pinter's plays in Slovenia between 1999 and 2014
Urša Gavez, 2016, original scientific article

Abstract: Harold Pinter started his career with a conspicuous lack of success. He faced negative critical reviews of his early works, but his typical style eventually opened doors to new worlds in modern drama. On Slovene stages, Pinter's plays also received a similarly modest welcome. The audience as well as the reviewers found his long pauses, silences and incoherent dialogue insufficiently engaging. One of the main reasons for this could have been their unfamiliarity with Pinter's style, which eventually acquired its own adjective - "Pinteresque". With time, Pinter's popularity increased more rapidly on the world stages than in Slovenia, and today this playwright is not a stranger to the Slovene theatre. This article deals with Pinter on Slovene stages as well as the popular and critical reception of his plays. The period before 1999 was thoroughly analysed by Darja Hribar, while this study is the first to focus on the decade and a half following.
Keywords: English literature, English drama, theatre, reception, translation, Harold Pinter, drama
Published in DKUM: 16.05.2017; Views: 1221; Downloads: 375
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3.
Harold Pinter in Slovene translations
Darja Darinka Hribar, 2004, original scientific article

Abstract: This article examines the translation of Harold Pinter's most notable stylistic peculiarities into Slovene, illustrating its main points with examples taken from his play The Homecoming. The findings demonstrate above all a marked degree of non-observance of the special verbal pattern (special cohesion) of the originals, a failure to convey Pinter's special configuration of meaning (special coherence), and a disregard for internal unifying coincidences. It argues that the Slovene translations of Pinter rely mostly on traditional theories of meaning and of language norms, thus preventing the reproduction of those emotional and psychological actions of Pinter's characters which are usually not expressed by means of the rhetorical, informative elements of his dialogue, but by its form and sonority, i. e. the length, strength, and level of articulation of verbal expression. This blurs Pinter's famous logic of emotion, narrows the proverbial openness and conceptual uncertainty of his plays, and limits their potential vitality in translation. Taking into account current drama and theatre translation practices in Slovenia, i.e. the rarity of published drama translation and the depedence on a translated performance text for subsequent theatrical productions, the article argues that in such cases the drama translation should be retrospective, i.e. aiming at a maximum reconstruction of all relevant linguistic, stylistic, and textual properties of the original, leaving expressly subjective interventions in the text to the theatre practitioners.
Keywords: English literature, drama, translation, theory of translation, translation of beletristics, cohesion, coherence, comparative analyses, drama translations
Published in DKUM: 16.05.2017; Views: 1694; Downloads: 151
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4.
An examination of lexical choices in Slovene translations of British and American drama
Darja Darinka Hribar, 2005, original scientific article

Abstract: The article examines lexical choices preferred by a noted Slovene translator of dramatic texts. It is based on the assumption that in spite of the fact that lexical choices offer much greater freedom in translation than, for instance, grammatical choices, they are subject to a number of intratextual and extratextual factors defining the genre, the kind of translation, and specific features of individual plays. Although examples are taken from only one set of translations of Tennessee Williams's A Streetcar Named Desire, they also refer to other working and published versions of dramatranslations into Slovene, including Albee's Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Miller's Death of a Salesman, Pinter's plays, and Shaw's Pygmalion. The shifts considered in the article relate to register, i. e. factors of language variation affecting lexical choices related to the field, mode, and tenor of discourse.
Keywords: translation, translating, translation exercises, drama, drama translation, shifts, register, lexis, lexical choice, Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire
Published in DKUM: 12.05.2017; Views: 1473; Downloads: 371
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5.
Alliteration as a means of characterization of dramatic personae : a translation issue
Tomaž Onič, 2006, original scientific article

Abstract: Alliteration is usually defined as a repetition of the same initial consonant in consecutive or neighbouring words. Despite its importance for dramatic construction, alliteration is rarely preserved in Slovene translations of dramatic texts. Detailed research into this phenomenon in several British and American plays and their Slovene translations showed that the survival of alliterations in the translation process is mostly random. On the rare occasions when alliteration is preserved, no proof could be found of a dear translation strategy focusing on this linguistic element. Since alliteration in most cases appears not as an isolated language element but rather as one of many important text features, the translator should devise priorities. The purpose of this article is not to urge translators to give alliteration the highest priority, but merely to suggest its inclusion among the features considered. This paper also includes examples of non-preservance of alliteration in translated text illustrating the loss for the text and its implications.
Keywords: translation, drama, literary translation, drama translation, alliteration, characterisation
Published in DKUM: 12.05.2017; Views: 1453; Downloads: 173
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6.
Pinter's The Caretaker in Two German Translations
Barbara Selinšek, 2016, undergraduate thesis

Abstract: The focus of the thesis lies on the linguistic and stylistic comparison of Pinter’s drama The Caretaker and two German translations by Willy H. Thiem, Der Hausmeister, from 1961 and the more contemporary German translation by Michael Walter from 2005. The aim of the thesis is to examine how and to what extent have the characteristics of Pinter’s style been preserved in the two German translations. The thesis is composed of eight chapters; chapter one is introductory and defines basic terminology used in the thesis and provides purpose of the thesis. Chapter two presents the life and work of Harold Pinter. Chapter three is subdivided into two parts and offers the analysis of The Caretaker, the plot, characters, relationships and action and provides information on German translations of Pinter’s plays and how they were presented on German stages. Chapter four is divided into two parts; the first part focuses on translation of literary style in general and the second on translation of drama in particular. Chapter five presents Pinter’s stylistic features. Chapter six is subdivided in five parts and discusses different stylistic shifts in the German translation: repetition, obsolescence of certain expressions, alliteration, colloquialism, register and manner of address. The analysis of examples taken from the original text and the translations shows to what extent have Pinter’s stylistic devices been preserved in the two German translations. Also commentary and further suggestions for the translation into German are offered. Conclusions are drawn in chapter seven; the comparison of Pinter’s drama The Caretaker and two German translations shows that there are some discrepancies in the application of Pinter’s stylistic devices in the translation; many stylistic shifts occur, and the two translators, in most cases, do not consider Pinter’s significant stylistic elements in their translations. In chapter eight the works that have been used for the research are listed.
Keywords: Harold Pinter, The Caretaker, translation of literary style, drama, translation, stylistic shifts
Published in DKUM: 21.09.2016; Views: 1320; Downloads: 95
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