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1.
DOMAIN-SPECIFIC LANGUAGE FOR TIME MEASURING ON SPORT COMPETITIONS
Iztok Fister, 2011, bachelor thesis/paper

Abstract: Measuring time in mass sporting competitions is, typically, performed with a timing system that consists of a measuring technology and a computer system. The first is dedicated to tracking events that are triggered by competitors and registered by measuring devices (primarily based on RFID technology). The latter enables the processing of these events. In this paper, the processing of events is performed by an agent that is controlled by the domain-specific language, EasyTime. EasyTime improves the flexibility of the timing system because it supports the measuring of time in various sporting competitions, their quick adaptation to the demands of new sporting competitions and a reduction in the number of measuring devices. Essentially, we are focused on the development of a domain-specific language. In practice, we made two case studies of using EasyTime by measuring time in two different sporting competitions. The use of EasyTime showed that it can be useful for sports clubs and competition organizers by aiding in the results of smaller sporting competitions, while in larger sporting competitions it could simplify the configuration of the timing system.
Keywords: domain-specific languages, programming languages, RFID technology
Published: 09.06.2011; Views: 3317; Downloads: 400
.pdf Full text (2,08 MB)

2.
Using ontologies in the domain analysis of domain-specific languages
Robert Tairas, Marjan Mernik, Jeffrey G. Gray, 2008, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: The design stage of domain-specific language development, which includes domain analysis, has not received as much attention compared to the subsequentstage of language implementation. This paper investigates the use of ontology in domain analysis for the development of a domain-specific language. The standard process of ontology development is investigated as an aid to determine the pertinent information regarding the domain (e.g., the conceptualization of the domain and the common and variable elements of the domain) that should be modeled in a language for the domain. Our observations suggest that ontology assists in the initial phase of domain understanding and can be combined with further formal domain analysis methods during the development of a domain-specific language.
Keywords: domain-specific languages, programming languages, ontology, domain analysis
Published: 31.05.2012; Views: 819; Downloads: 84
URL Link to full text

3.
Model transformations require formal semantics
Yu Sun, Zekai Demirezen, Tomaž Lukman, Marjan Mernik, Jeffrey G. Gray, 2008, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: Despite the increasing interest in model-driven engineering, there are many open issues that need to be addressed to advance the technology and promote its adoption. This position paper outlines several current limitations of model transformation, with a specific emphasis on model optimization. A primary shortcoming that can be found in many model transformation approaches and tools is the lack of formal semantics to define the meaning of a modeling abstraction. This inadequacy is the source of many problems surrounding the practice of model engineering.
Keywords: domain-specific languages, program transformation, model transformation, model-driven engineering, modeling language
Published: 31.05.2012; Views: 1122; Downloads: 24
URL Link to full text

4.
Is my DSL a modeling or programming language?
Yu Sun, Zekai Demirezen, Marjan Mernik, Jeffrey G. Gray, Barrett Richard Bryant, 2008, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: It is often difficult to discern the differences between programming and modeling languages. As an example, the term "domain-specific language" has been used almost interchangeably in academia and industry to represent both programming and modeling languages, which has caused subtle misconceptions. The borders between a modeling and programming language are somewhat vague and not defined crisply. This paper discusses the similarities and differences between modeling and programming languages, and offers some suggestions on how to better differentiate such languages. A list of criteria is presented for language classification, but it is suggested that a set of the criteria be used, rather than a single criterion. Several example domain-specific languages are used as case studies to motivate the discussion.
Keywords: domain-specific languages, programming languages, modeling language
Published: 31.05.2012; Views: 913; Downloads: 17
URL Link to full text

5.
A preliminary study on various implementation approaches of domain-specific language
Tomaž Kosar, Pablo E. Martínez López, Pablo A. Barrientos, Marjan Mernik, 2008, original scientific article

Abstract: Various implementation approaches for developing a domain-specific language are available in literature. There are certain common beliefs about the advantages/disadvantages of these approaches. However, it is hard to be objective and speak in favor of a particular one, since these implementation approaches are normally compared over diverse application domains. The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical results from ten diverse implementation approaches for domain-specific languages, but conducted using the same representative language. Comparison shows that these discussed approaches differ in terms of the effort need to implement them, however, the effort needed by a programmer to implement a domain-specific language should not be the only factor taken into consideration. Another important factor is the effort needed by an end-user to rapidly write correct programs using the produced domain-specific language. Therefore, this paper also provides empirical results on end-user productivity, which is measured as the lines of code needed to express a domain-specific program, similarity to the original notation, and how error-reporting and debugging are supported in a given implementation.
Keywords: domain-specific languages, embedded approach, preprocessing, compiler/interpreter generator, extesible compiler/interpreter
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 943; Downloads: 65
URL Link to full text

6.
MARS: A Metamodel Recovery System Using Grammar Inference
Faizan Javed, Marjan Mernik, Jeffrey G. Gray, Barrett Richard Bryant, 2008, original scientific article

Abstract: Domain-specific modeling (DSM) assists subject matter experts in describing the essential characteristics of a problem in their domain. When a metamodel is lost, repositories of domain models can become orphaned from their defining metamodel. Within the purview of model-driven engineering, the ability to recover the design knowledge in a repository of legacy models is needed. In this paper we describe MARS, a semi-automatic grammar-centric system that leverages grammar inference techniques to solve the metamodel recovery problem. The paper also contains an applicative case study, as well as experimental results from the recovery of several metamodels in diverse domains.
Keywords: domain-specific languages, metamodeling, recovery systems, reverse engineering, re-ingineering
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 832; Downloads: 64
URL Link to full text

7.
Comparing general-purpose and domain-specific languages
Tomaž Kosar, Nuno Oliveira, Marjan Mernik, Maria João Varando Pereira, Matej Črepinšek, Daniela Da Cruz, Pedro Rangel Henriques, 2010, original scientific article

Abstract: Many domain-specific languages, that try to bring feasible alternatives for existing solutions while simplifying programming work, have come up in recent years. Although, these little languages seem to be easy to use, there is an open issue whether they bring advantages in comparison to the application libraries, which are the most commonly used implementation approach. In this work, we present an experiment, which was carried out to compare such a domain-specific language with a comparable application library. The experimentwas conducted with 36 programmers, who have answered a questionnaireon both implementation approaches. The questionnaire is more than100 pages long. For a domain-specific language and the application library, the same problem domain has been used - construction of graphical user interfaces. In terms of a domain-specific language, XAML has been used and C# Forms for the application library. A cognitive dimension framework has been used for a comparison between XAML and C# Forms.
Keywords: program comprehension, DSL, domain-specific languages, program understanding
Published: 06.07.2017; Views: 586; Downloads: 78
.pdf Full text (144,26 KB)
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8.
Program comprehension for domain-specific languages
Maria João Varando Pereira, Marjan Mernik, Daniela Da Cruz, Pedro Rangel Henriques, 2008, original scientific article

Abstract: In the past, we have been looking for program comprehension tools that are able to interconnect operational and behavioral views, aiming at aiding the software analyst to relate problem and program domains in order to reach a full understanding of software systems. In this paper we are concerned with Program Comprehension issues applied to Domain Specific Languages (DSLs). We are now willing to understand how techniques and tools for the comprehension of traditional programming languages fit in the understanding of DSLs. Being the language tailored for the description of problems in a specific domain, we believe that specific visualizations (at a higher abstraction level, closer to the problem level) could and should be defined to enhance the comprehension of the descriptions in that particular domain.
Keywords: program comprehension, DSL, domain-specific languages, program understanding
Published: 06.07.2017; Views: 860; Downloads: 209
.pdf Full text (248,98 KB)
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