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1.
2.
A reconfiguration pattern for distributed embedded systems
Roman Gumzej, Matjaž Colnarič, Wolfgang A. Halang, 2007, original scientific article

Abstract: A reconfiguration pattern for UML-based projects of embedded (real-time) systems is defined. It enables to set up hardware/software configurations, and to specify conditions and methods for dynamic reconfiguration. The reconfiguration pattern was inspired by the reconfiguration management solution of the Specification PEARL methodology, which is based on the standard for Multiprocessor PEARL whose original idea it was to extend the language to enable the programming of distributed real-time applications in PEARL. In Specification PEARL, the possibility for abstract descriptions of hardware and software architectures and for defining mappings from software to hardware components has been enhanced in correspondence with the standard. Here, a UML pattern for reconfiguration management in distributed embedded applications based on concepts from Specification PEARL is presented. Its behavioural, structural and functional aspects are outlined. It addresses stereotype entities from the Specification PEARL language, which were joined in a UML profile, and outlines the related reconfiguration management mechanisms, which were carried over to the mentioned UML pattern. The proposed reconfiguration pattern is to facilitate the development of distributed embedded application in UML with consistent and temporally predictable reconfiguration support. It should also support and enhance the applicationsć flexibility and portability.
Keywords: real-time, distributed, embedded systems, dynamic reconfiguration, UML profiles and patterns, UML-RT, specification PEARL
Published: 31.05.2012; Views: 1231; Downloads: 61
URL Link to full text

3.
Local search engine with global content based on domain specific knowledge
Sandi Pohorec, Mateja Verlič, Milan Zorman, 2009, original scientific article

Abstract: In the growing need for information we have come to rely on search engines. The use of large scale search engines, such as Google, is as common as surfingthe World Wide Web. We are impressed with the capabilities of these search engines but still there is a need for improvment. A common problem withsearching is the ambiguity of words. Their meaning often depends on the context in which they are used or varies across specific domains. To resolve this we propose a domain specific search engine that is globally oriented. We intend to provide content classification according to the target domain concepts, access to privileged information, personalization and custom rankingfunctions. Domain specific concepts have been formalized in the form ofontology. The paper describes our approach to a centralized search service for domain specific content. The approach uses automated indexing for various content sources that can be found in the form of a relational database, we! b service, web portal or page, various document formats and other structured or unstructured data. The gathered data is tagged with various approaches and classified against the domain classification. The indexed data is accessible through a highly optimized and personalized search service.
Keywords: information search, personalization, indexes, crawling, domain specific crawling, natural language processing, content tagging, distributed data sources, ranking functions
Published: 31.05.2012; Views: 1077; Downloads: 23
URL Link to full text

4.
2-local 3/4-competitive algorithm for multicoloring hexagonal graphs
Petra Šparl, Janez Žerovnik, 2005, original scientific article

Abstract: An important optimization problem in the design of cellular networks is to assign sets of frequencies to transmitters to avoid unacceptable interference.A cellular network is generally modeled as a subgraph of the infinite triangular lattice. Frequency assignment problem can be abstracted asa multicoloring problem on a weighted hexagonal graph, where the weights represent the number of calls to be assigned at vertices. In this paper we present a distributed algorithm for multicoloring hexagonal graphs using only the local clique numbers ▫$omega_1(v)$▫ and ▫$omega_2(v)$▫ at each vertex v of the given hexagonal graph, which can be computed from local information available at thevertex. We prove the algorithm uses no more than ▫$4omega(G)/3$▫ colors for any hexagonal graph G, without explicitly computing the global clique number ▫$omega(G)$▫. We also prove that our algorithm is 2-local, i.e., the computation at a vertex v ▫$in$▫ G uses only information about the demands of vertices whose graph distance from v is less than or equal to 2.
Keywords: mathematics, graph theory, graph colouring, 2-local distributed algorithm, cellular networks, frequency planning
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 1301; Downloads: 58
URL Link to full text

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An optimal permutation routing algorithm for full-duplex hexagonal mesh networks
Ignasi Sau Walls, Janez Žerovnik, 2006

Abstract: In the permutation routing problem, each processor is the origin of at most one packet and each processor is the destination of no more than one packet. We study this problem in an hexagonal network (that is, a finite convex subgraph of a triangular grid), a widely used network in practical applications. We use the addressing scheme described by F.G. Nocetti, I. Stojmenovic and J. Zhang (2002, IEEE Trans. on Parallel and Distrib. Systems). In this paper, a distributed optimal routing algorithm for full-duplex hexagonal mesh networks is presented. Furthermore, we prove that this algorithm is oblivious and translation invariant.
Keywords: mathematics, hexagonal networks, permutation routing, shortest path, distributed algorithm, communication networks, oblivious algorithm
Published: 10.07.2015; Views: 413; Downloads: 21
URL Link to full text

7.
2-local distributed algorithms for generalized coloring of hexagonal graphs
Petra Šparl, Janez Žerovnik, 2005, published scientific conference contribution

Abstract: A 2-local distributed approximation algorithm for multicoloring of a triangle-free hexagonal graph which uses at most ▫$lceil frac{5omega(G)}{4} rceil + 3$▫ colors is presented.
Keywords: matematika, teorija grafov, barvanje grafov, aproksimacijski algoritem, frekvenčni načrt, ▫$k$▫-lokalen porazdeljen algoritem, mathematics, graph theory, approximation algorithms, graph coloring, frequency planning, ▫$k$▫-local distributed algorithm
Published: 10.07.2015; Views: 518; Downloads: 58
URL Link to full text

8.
An optimal permutation routing algorithm on full-duplex hexagonal networks
Ignasi Sau Walls, Janez Žerovnik, 2008, original scientific article

Abstract: In the permutation routing problem, each processor is the origin of at most one packet and the destination of no more than one packet. The goal is to minimize the number of time steps required to route all packets to their respective destinations, under the constraint that each link can be crossed simultaneously by no more than one packet. We study this problem in a hexagonal network, i.e. a finite subgraph of a triangular grid, which is a widely used network in practical applications. We present an optimal distributed permutation routing algorithm for full-duplex hexagonal networks, using the addressing scheme described by Nocetti et al. Furthermore, we prove that this algorithm is oblivious and translation invariant.
Keywords: mathematics, hexagonal networks, permutation routing, shortest path, distributed algorithm, communication networks, oblivious algorithm
Published: 10.07.2015; Views: 424; Downloads: 69
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9.
Hybrid societies: challenges and perspectives in the design of collective behavior in self-organizing systems
Heiko Hamann, Yara Khaluf, Jean Botev, Mohammad Divband Soorati, Eliseo Ferrante, Oliver Kosak, Jean-Marc Montanier, Sanaz Mostaghim, Richard Redpath, Jon Timmis, Frank Veenstra, Mostafa Wahby, Aleš Zamuda, 2016, original scientific article

Abstract: Hybrid societies are self-organizing, collective systems, which are composed of different components, for example, natural and artificial parts (bio-hybrid) or human beings interacting with and through technical systems (socio-technical). Many different disciplines investigate methods and systems closely related to the design of hybrid societies. A stronger collaboration between these disciplines could allow for re-use of methods and create significant synergies. We identify three main areas of challenges in the design of self-organizing hybrid societies. First, we identify the formalization challenge. There is an urgent need for a generic model that allows a description and comparison of collective hybrid societies. Second, we identify the system design challenge. Starting from the formal specification of the system, we need to develop an integrated design process. Third, we identify the challenge of interdisciplinarity. Current research on self-organizing hybrid societies stretches over many different fields and hence requires the re-use and synthesis of methods at intersections between disciplines. We then conclude by presenting our perspective for future approaches with high potential in this area.
Keywords: hybrid society, bio-hybrid, distributed, self-organization, design, intedisciplinary
Published: 10.07.2017; Views: 417; Downloads: 207
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