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Spatial rotation and recognizing emotions : gender related differences in brain activity
Norbert Jaušovec, Ksenija Jaušovec, 2008, original scientific article

Abstract: In three experiments, gender and ability (performance and emotional intelligence) related differences in brain activity - assessed with EEG methodology - while respondents were solving a spatial rotation tasks and identifying emotions in faces were investigated. The most robust gender related difference in brain activity was observed in the lower-2 alpha band. Males and females displayed an inverse IQ-activation relationship in just that domain in which they usually perform better: females in the emotional intelligence domain, and males in the visuospatial ability domain. A similar pattern of brain activity could also be observed for the male/female respondents with different levels of performance and emotional IQ. It was suggested that high ability representatives of both genders to some extent compensate for their inferior problem solving skills (males in emotional tasks and females in spatial rotation tasks) by increasing their level of attention.
Keywords: psychology, cognitive processes, emotional intelligence, EEG activities, problem complexity, brain, memory, spatial rotation, gender, event-related desynchronization
Published in DKUM: 07.06.2012; Views: 2527; Downloads: 76
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Reasoning and self-awareness from adolescence to middle age : organization and development as a function of education
Andreas Demetriou, Karin Bakračevič, 2009, original scientific article

Abstract: This study involved four age groups: 13-15-, 23-25-, 33-35-, and 43-45-yr-olds. All adult groups involved persons with university education andpersons with low education. Participants (1) solved tasks addressed to spatial, propositional, and social reasoning, (2) evaluated their own performance and the difficulty of the tasks, and (3) answered an inventory probing their self-concept for these reasoning domains and for self-awareness and self-regulation. Structural modeling revealed that performance, self-evaluation, and self-representation are systematically interrelated. Performance in spatial and propositional reasoning stabilized in early adulthood, whereas in social reasoning and self-evaluation, performance improved throughout the age span studied. Educated persons performed better and rated themselves accordingly across all domains. The implications of these findings for the general theory of intelligence and cognitive developmentafter adolescence are discussed. The functional shift model is proposed to account for changes in the relative power of different abilities with increasing age.
Keywords: education, developmental psychology, cognitive processes, self-awareness, reasoning
Published in DKUM: 07.06.2012; Views: 2166; Downloads: 100
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