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1.
Weld joint fracture behaviour of HSLA steels dissimilar in strength
Inoslav Rak, Arpad Treiber, 1998, original scientific article

Abstract: The effect of strength differences (mismatch) between weld metal and two base metals as well as local variations of strength within weld metal/HAZ zones on the toughness properties were discussed. The significance of local fracture toughness measurement technique was also discussed by comparing the CTOD results of [delta]5 and British Standard [delta]BS. Some differences between the two techniqes were discussed in particular for CGHAZ toughness of similar and dissimilar joints.
Keywords: welding, welded joints, fracture mechanics, HSLA steels, fracture toughness
Published: 10.07.2015; Views: 843; Downloads: 24
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2.
The fracture behaviour of global/local mis-matched weld joints provided on HSLA steels
Inoslav Rak, Nenad Gubeljak, Zdravko Praunseis, 2001, original scientific article

Abstract: The fracture behaviour of thick section high strength steel weldments, that contain soft root passes, has been studied. Two different weld consumables with different strength mismatch (1>M>1) and fracture toughness properties in the WM have significantly increased the complexity of the mis-match effect and failure behaviour of weld joints, depending on the crack location and the thickness of the soft root layer. The aim was to explain the effect of strength heterogeneity between BM and WM and between different regions in WM (global/local mismatching). R-curves of WM and HAZ regions were also discussed. The conclusion is that the application of a welding procedure with a two-pass soft root layer, introduced for the purpose of reducing or even omitting preheating, can be recommended in mis-matched weld joints on steel grade HT80. Nevertheless, the alloying from BM, and the tempering effect of subsequent weld passes, have to be taken into account. They can cause reduction of the root region ductility and affect the local mismatch in WM and HAZ. The deterioration by providing a soft root layer can probably be reduced by a selected consumable and proper welding procedure. The final conclusion is that the application of a mismatched weld joint with a soft root layer can be recommended only if high root toughness can be provided.
Keywords: welding, welded joints, strength mismatching, fracture toughness, CTOD, hardness, impact toughness, HSLA steels
Published: 01.06.2012; Views: 1471; Downloads: 101
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3.
Weldability investigation of TStE 420 after weld thermal cycle simulation
Marko Dunđer, Tomaž Vuherer, Ivica Kladarić, 2010, original scientific article

Abstract: The paper presents a short description and overview of the weld thermal cycle simulation methods. An experimental investigation on the weld cycle simulated specimens is predicted by a plan of experiment using single cycle simulation. The obtained hardness results are compared with double cycle simulated specimens results of individual points in the heat-affected zone. Beside that, the characteristic microstructures of points in the heat-affected zone after a single weld thermal cycle simulation are given. A thermal simulation method is suitable for different weldability examinations. In this paper, the authors would like to investigate the maximal hardness of individual points in the weld joint what is important when considering cold cracking sensitivity.
Keywords: HSLA steels, weldability, weld thermal cycle simulation, hardness
Published: 31.05.2012; Views: 1125; Downloads: 26
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