| | SLO | ENG | Cookies and privacy

Bigger font | Smaller font

Search the digital library catalog Help

Query: search in
search in
search in
search in
* old and bologna study programme

Options:
  Reset


1 - 5 / 5
First pagePrevious page1Next pageLast page
1.
The perceived value of college education and experience to police work in Slovenia
Jason Rydberg, Mahesh Nalla, Gorazd Meško, 2010, original scientific article

Abstract: Purpose: This paper examines the distribution of officer demographic characteristics on dispositions across the perceived value of both college education and experience to police work in the post-independent Slovenia. Design/Methods/Approach: Using the responses of 995 Slovenian police officers, the present analysis utilizes bivariate tests of significance to examine how characteristics such as education level, experience, and occupational role are related to the perceived value of college education and experience to police work. Findings: Overall, the officers in the sample perceived experience to be far more beneficial to their work than college education. In terms of specific officer characteristics, college educated officers and female officers perceived college education to be beneficial to their work, relative to high school educated, male colleagues. In terms of experience, less experienced officers, younger officers, and those with lower salaries perceived experience to be more beneficial than their more experienced, older, well-compensated counterparts. There were also differences among occupational groups, with patrol officers finding experience more beneficial. Research limitations/implications: Given that the data were not drawn from a study specifically focused on the perceived benefits of education or experience, the dependent measures could be improved. Originality/Value: Though much research in the United States has sought to examine the effect of gaining a college education on police attitudes and behaviors, little research has examined the extent to which police officers themselves perceive college education and experience to be beneficial to their work, particularly in Eastern Europe.
Keywords: Slovenia Police, college education, experience, police attitudes
Published: 12.05.2020; Views: 352; Downloads: 7
URL Link to full text
This document has many files! More...

2.
Police officers' and citizens' attitudes toward the provision of safety/security in local communities in Slovenia : doctoral dissertation
Maja Modic, 2013, doctoral dissertation

Abstract: Main purpose of the dissertation is to compare police officers’ and citizens’ attitudes toward various aspects of local safety provision, with the emphasis on community policing, which is currently the main philosophy of policing in Slovenia. Data for the study comes from a survey administred to a sample of police officers and citizens to assess their attitudes on a broad range of issues regarding the provision of safety on the local level as related to Slovene police in general, police effectiveness in various activities, legality of police work and citizens’ willingness to cooperate with the police among others. Within the comparison between citizens’ and police officers’ attitudes, areas of the highest and the lowest degree of concordance between attitudes were identified and examined. Attitudes of police officers and citizens were found to be most dissimilar regarding legality of police work, effectiveness in protecting life, personal safety and property, general perceptions of police and effectiveness in community policing. Overall level of concordance between attitudes of both groups was found to be low. The foci of our further analysis were the factors which influence citizens’ and police officers’ attitudes toward police effectiveness in community policing. Effects of gender, age, education, fear of crime and residency characteristics on citizens’ attitudes were examined, and effects of age, education, participatory management, organizational support, job satisfaction and community support on police officers’ attitudes were examined. Results of regression analysis showed that police visibility, trust in the government, age, fear of crime and length of residency affect citizens’ attitudes toward police effectiveness in community policing, however these variables account only for 30.1 percent of the variation in citizens' attitudes toward community policing. Police officers’ attitudes toward police effectiveness in community policing are affected by age, education, organizational support, job satisfaction and community support. These variables were found to account only for 28.7 percent of the variation in police officers' attitudes toward community policing. Majority of the variation in both groups’ attitudes toward community policing thus remains unexplained. Suggestions for further research and policy implication are provided, focused on inclusion of additional variables into model of police officers’ attitudes and model of citizens’ attitudes. Variables found to affect citizens of both groups toward police effectiveness in community policing by the findings of present research should be taken into consideration by police administrators and local safety policy makers.
Keywords: police officers’ attitudes, citizens’ attitudes, local safety provision, community policing, police-community relations, police-community cooperation, community policing officer, local safety council
Published: 15.04.2013; Views: 2297; Downloads: 234
.pdf Full text (1,42 MB)

3.
4.
5.
Search done in 0.16 sec.
Back to top
Logos of partners University of Maribor University of Ljubljana University of Primorska University of Nova Gorica